spectral

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spec·tral

(spek'trăl),
Relating to a spectrum.

spectral

/spec·tral/ (spek´tral) pertaining to a spectrum; performed by means of a spectrum.

spec·tral

(spek'trăl)
Relating to a spectrum.

spectral 

1. Relating or belonging to a spectrum.
2. Relating to wavelength.

Patient discussion about spectral

Q. What is the difference between autism, and autism spectrum? Doctor states my child is autistic, school says he has autism spectrum disorder. What is the difference? Can medication help with any of this?

A. i agree with Lilian- it's just a way for schools to keep their behinds clean...

Q. What is a "spectrum disorder" mean? I just heard/read about spectrum disorder, What is a "spectrum disorder" mean?

A. Autism is a spectrum disorder where symptoms and characteristics can present themselves in a wide variety of combinations, from mild to severe and in any combination. A high functioning individual with autism might simply seem eccentric, a loner. More severely affected individuals may hardly communicate and prefer to function primarily in "their own world". Most individuals fall in the middle of the spectrum.

Q. What shall I do with my 3 years old son with autism spectrum disorder. What shall I do with my 3 years old son with autism spectrum disorder to increase on his Sensory Integration. I feel therapy is too costly to afford….Is there any alternative.

A. there are some computer software that can do that too, and it doesn't cost all that much.they combine hearing- seeing and feeling.
i saw a computer USB contraption that also work int hat method and i think it costs 150-200 $ ...not sure....

More discussions about spectral
References in periodicals archive ?
With these stresses in mind, I explore the nexus of melodrama and spectrality following the cues offered by Mary Shelley's experience of it.
One way of linking hauntology to metamorphictional writing is to consider Kafka's commentary on the spectrality of epistolary writing.
L'espace(ment) n'existe pas ou n'existe plus (space[ing] does not exist or no longer exists), and, with this absence, all dichotomies, separations, and differences are erased: The known and the unknowable, writer and reader, simultaneity and rime lag, all are one and the same, part of one world--the world of spectrality.
Characterizing Marxist ideology in terms of spectrality and hauntology that collapse the past, present, and future without distinction, Derrida writes:
The startling quality of the Russian theme resides in its spectrality.
The final chapter, on "Queer Spectrality," pulls all of the carefully-elaborated possibilities together in a complex argument about identity politics in postmodern and early modern texts.
16) See the introduction, where all these claims are made, in Julian Wolfreys, Victorian Hauntings: Spectrality, Gothic, the Uncanny and Literature (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp.
In its white spectrality," wrote Montgomery Schuyler, "`it shines over city and river.
These metaphors of spectrality not only hint at her ultimate fate but also connect her with another incorporeal figure in Idylls, Percivale's sister, whose extreme asceticism, noted earlier, renders her virtually transparent.
Indissociable from textuality, spectrality can be viewed as a metaphor for the essential negativity at the heart of language: "Death strolls between letters" declares Derrida (108).
The Dance Partner emphasizes the spectrality of the Ghost Dance, both as an historical movement and as an activating metaphor for contemporary indigenous identity.
By reading Donoghue's reparative gesture through recent articulations of spectrality and queer temporality, I present the novel as a form of narrative crypt that provides a phantasmal space for the spectral return of those who have been abjected from history, not only as a consequence of their gender, race, and class, but also because of their inability or refusal to comply with the normative temporal rhythms of the society in which they live.