spectacles

(redirected from spectacle)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

glasses

 [glas´ez]
lenses arranged in a frame holding them in the proper position in front of the eyes, as an aid to vision. Called also eyeglasses and spectacles.
bifocal glasses glasses with bifocal lenses; see also bifocal glasses.
trifocal glasses glasses with trifocal lenses.

spec·ta·cles

(spek'tĭ-kĕlz),
Lenses set in a frame that holds them in front of the eyes, used to correct errors of refraction or to protect the eyes. The parts of the spectacles are the lenses; the bridge between the lenses, resting on the nose; the rims or frames, encircling the lenses; the sides or temples that pass on either side of the head to the ears; the bows, the curved extremities of the temples; the shoulders, short bars attached to the rims or the lenses and jointed with the sides.
Synonym(s): eyeglasses, glasses (1)
[L. specto, pp. -atus, to watch, observe]

spectacles

Opthalmology Glasses, gafas, occhiali, lunettes Vox populi A scene (spectacle)

spec·ta·cles

(spek'tă-kĕlz)
Lenses set in a frame that holds them in front of the eyes, used to correct errors of refraction or to protect the eyes. The parts of the spectacles are: the lenses; the bridge between the lenses, resting on the nose; the rims or frames, encircling the lenses; the sides or temples that pass on either side of the head to the ears; the bows, the curved extremities of the temples; and the shoulders, short bars attached to the rims or the lenses and jointed with the sides.
Synonym(s): eyeglasses, glasses.
[L. specto, pp. -atus, to watch, observe]

spectacles

Pairs of simple thin lenses, usually mounted in frames and used for the correction of short sight (MYOPIA), long sight (HYPERMETROPIA), ASTIGMATISM and PRESBYOPIA.

spectacles 

An optical appliance consisting of a pair of ophthalmic lenses mounted in a frame or rimless mount, resting on the nose and held in place by sides extending towards or over the ears. Syn. eyeglass frame; eyeglasses; eyewear (colloquial); glasses; spectacle frame. See acetone; pantoscopic angle; retroscopic angle; angling; bridge; clipover; eczema; endpiece; eyesize; front; hinge; lens washer; lorgnette; mount; pad; plastic; rim; side; spectacle frame markings; sunglasses; temple; tortoiseshell.
aphakic spectacles Spectacles mounted with aphakic lenses used to compensate the loss of optical power resulting from a cataract extraction when no intraocular lens implant has been inserted. Syn. cataract glasses. See aphakic lens.
billiards spectacles Spectacles incorporating joints that enable the wearer to adjust the angle of the sides (British Standard).
folding spectacles Spectacles that are hinged at the bridge and in the sides, so as to fold with the two lenses in apposition.
half-eye spectacles A pair of spectacles for near vision, designed so that the lenses cover only half of the field of view, usually the lower half (Fig. S10). Syn. half-eyes.
hemianopic spectacles Spectacles incorporating a device that provides a lateral displacement of one or both fields of view. The device is usually a prism such as a Fresnel Press-On prism, which is placed over the blind (hemianopic) side of the visual field. A mirror system may also be used. The view within that side of the field is imaged on the seeing side of the visual field of the eye.
industrial spectacles Spectacles made with plastic or safety glass and solid frame, sometimes with side shields. They are used in industrial occupations where there are possible hazards to the eye. See Fig. S6; safety glass; goggles; safety lens.
library spectacles A plastic spectacle frame with heavyweight front and sides. Syn. library frame.
magnifying spectacles Spectacles containing lenses of high convex power (+10 D or higher) used for near vision.
orthopaedic spectacles Spectacles with attachments designed to relieve certain anatomical deformities such as entropion, ptosis, etc. See Horner's syndrome.
pinhole spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having one or more small apertures. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision (e.g. corneal scar). See stenopaeic spectacles; low vision.
recumbent spectacles Spectacles intended to be used while recumbent. They usually incorporate a prism that deflects a beam of light through approximately 90º while keeping the image erect. See yoke prisms.
reversible spectacles Spectacles that are designed to be worn with either lens before either eye.
rimless spectacles Spectacles without rims, the lenses being fastened to the frame by screws, clamps or similar devices. See lens groove; rim.
stenopaeic spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having a slit. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision. See stenopaeic disc; pinhole spectacles; low vision.
supra spectacles Spectacles in which the lenses are held in position by thin nylon threads attached to the rims. See lens groove; rim.
telescopic spectacles See telescopic lens.
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectaclesenlarge picture
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectacles
References in periodicals archive ?
As to our general population itself, "Miss America" winners are programmed to laugh or cry at exact moments, especially at victory - a necessary forfeiture of the emotional self for the spectacle. And game-show contestants must pass virtual rehearsals demonstrating their capacity to emote in wide-mouthed commodity joy.
Today, this 140-year-old brand of 140 is an innovation leader in ophthalmic optics, including lenses and spectacle frames.
A Hong Kong researcher who developed spectacle lenses to combat myopia progression says the technology "helps safeguard the vision of children."
Grace Browning, Founder of Krupa Foundation, said she was appreciative of the involvement of IVI in this project which would be of tremendous benefit to the spectacle recipients who in most cases come from an "underprivileged background who may not have had an access to this, otherwise."
The author explores how theatre in the UK, particularly plays and productions staged in London in the 21st century, has responded to the use of theatrical spectacle by those who wage war or manage perceptions of war, such as the state, the military, and the media, and how these productions have encouraged audiences to watch war and other forms of conflict and violence with more attention to spectacle and how spectacles aim to impose specific ideologies or attract media audiences.
San Mig Light shines bright on International Beer Day !-- -- (The Philippine Star) - August 29, 2019 - 12:00am Bright lights, good beats, and great conversations San Mig Light sure knows how to throw a party MANILA, Philippines We can all use a little bit of spectacle in our lives, especially in a corporate jungle like Eastwood City where the daily grind never stops.
Today, it is a 140-year old innovation leader in ophthalmic optics including lenses and spectacle frames.
30 November 2018 - Indiana, US-based gaming business Spectacle Entertainment LLC to acquire Indiana-based gaming and hospital services provider Majestic Holdco, LLC in a cash transaction, the company said.
Debord, Time and Spectacle: Hegelian Marxism and Situationist Theory
Robert Scoble, the infamous and enthusiastic tech blogger who shot a selfie with the Google Glass while naked in the shower, says that Spectacle Snapbots 'make a lot more sense than the way Google rolled out Google Glass to developers and nerds.'
Devaney, Thomas, Enemies in the Plaza: Urban Spectacle and the End of Spanish Frontier Culture, 1460-1492 (Middle Ages), Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015; cloth; pp.
This single group cohort study, undertaken at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from Jan 2012 to September 2013, assessed patients' satisfaction, spectacle independence and visual disturbance after implantation of multifocal IOLs.