specific language impairment


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specific language impairment

Abbreviation: SLI
A common impairment in language development affecting about 4% to 6% of children in which nonverbal intelligence is normal but skills such as the ability to name objects or to understand word meanings lags.
See also: impairment
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of sentence length and complexity on working memory performance in Hungarian children with specific language impairment (SLI): a cross linguistic comparison.
(2009) [47] used the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP) (ES range: 0.02-1.42, n = 2), revealing significantly better performance in phonological awareness and the nonword repetition subtests in the index mothers compared to mothers of children with a specific language impairment. In contrast, however, Schmidt et al.
Longitudinal patterns of behavioral, emotional, and social difficulties and self-concepts in adolescents with a history of specific language impairment. Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch.
James, "Selfesteem in children with specific language impairment," Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol.
Association of D16S515 microsatellite with specific language impairment on Robinson Crusoe Island, an isolated Chilean population: a possible key to understanding language development.
Farmer, "Language and social cognition in children with specific language impairment," Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol.
Auditory lexical decisions of children with specific language impairment. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 39, 1263-1273.
Her mother wrote to me that the student has a specific learning disability affecting her receptive and expressive language abilities (the terms "specific language impairment" or "pragmatic impairment" were not used).
The inverse relationship also holds; kids with Specific Language Impairment, marked by difficulties with grammar and complex syntax, also have trouble processing musical syntax, Koelsch, Jentschke and collaborators reported in 2008 in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

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