specific epithet

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spe·cif·ic ep·i·thet

in bacteriology, the second part of the name of a species; it is not, by itself, a name; the name of a bacterial species consists of two parts, the generic name and the specific epithet.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

specific epithet

n.
The uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun that follows a capitalized genus name in binomial nomenclature and serves to distinguish a species from others in the same genus, as saccharum in Acer saccharum (sugar maple). Also called trivial name.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In all cases, where there are specific epithets, these must be declined in the genitive, if they are declinable.
Plants spread by creeping rootstocks which protrude past the fronds, hence the specific epithet "protrusa." Synonym: Cystopterisfragilis (Linnaeus) Bernhardi var.
The specific epithet is referring to its habit of sometimes growing on logs, thus being high or exalted.
Son are found on the margins of the pinnules, hence the specific epithet, marginalis.
The specific epithet is in honor of Carl Sigismund Kunth, a professor of botany at Berlin (Thieret 1980).
Both the specific epithet and common name of this species are in reference to the wet habitats in which this plant is usually found.
The specific epithet is referring to the sporangia resembling the rattles of a rattlesnake (Crotalus).
The specific epithet is a misnomer based on an early drawing with a large, exaggerated rachis (Nelson 2000).
The specific epithet alludes to the wing-shaped fronds or possibly to the fiddleheads resemblance to an eagle's foot.
The specific epithet means black-foot" referring to the leaf bases, though they are not always black.
The specific epithet refers to the lack of a well developed creeping rootsystem; thus the plant is "footless" (Snyder and Bruce 1986).
The specific epithet refers to the appressed sporophylls.