species-specific

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species-specific

 [spe´shēz-spĕ-sif´ik]
characteristic of a particular species; having a characteristic effect on, or interaction with, cells or tissues of members of a particular species; said of an antigen, drug, or infective agent.

spe·cies-·spe·cif·ic

(spē'shēz-spĕ-sif'ik),
Characteristic of a given species; serum that is produced by the injection of immunogens into an animal, and that acts only on the cells, protein, etc., of a member of the same species as that from which the original antigen was obtained.

species-specific

/spe·cies-spe·cif·ic/ (-spĕ-sif´ik)
1. characteristic of a particular species.
2. having a characteristic effect on, or interaction with, cells or tissues of members of a particular species; said of an antigen, drug, or infective agent.

species-specific

(spē′shēz-spĭ-sĭf′ĭk, -sēz-)
adj.
Limited to or found only in one species: a species-specific antibody; a species-specific virus.

spe′cies-spec′i·fic′i·ty (-spĕs′ə-fĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

species-specific

Etymology: L, specere, to see, facere, to make
1 characteristic of a particular species.
2 having a characteristic effect on, or interaction with, cells, tissues, or membranes of a particular species, said of an antigen, drug, or infective agent.

spe·cies-spe·cif·ic

(spē'shēz spĕ-sif'ik)
Characteristic of a given species; serum that is produced by the injection of immunogens into an animal, and that acts only on the cells or protein, of a member of the same species as that from which the original antigen was obtained.

species-specific

characteristic of a particular species; having a characteristic effect on, or interaction with, cells or tissues of members of a particular species; said of an antigen, drug or infective agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such tick species-specificity of SFGR should be considered when speculating on any geopathologic relationships of rickettsioses among different SFGR-endemic areas.
Gases where the same compound is used as a pheromone by more than one species are not uncommon: in such cases, species-specificity of the message may be preserved through use of different enantiomers (or different proportions of two enantiomers).
The species-specificity of the bacterium active against black-fly larvae, for instance, "is extremely unusual for an insecticide," Molloy notes.