species

(redirected from species difference)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in VIP projections from the SCN to ORX neurons may contribute to species differences in the regulation of the sleep wake cycle: whereas in grass rats regulation may be in part mediated by direct projections from the SCN to areas involved in arousal, in the nocturnal lab rat this regulation may involve an indirect pathway that connects the SCN to neurons in the lateral and posterior hypothalamus.
These include: (1) the number of genes causing species differences; (2) the magnitudes of allelic effects at these loci; (3) the modes of gene action (additivity, dominance, epistasis); and (4) pleiotropy versus linkage of effects on correlated traits.
Together, these results show that significant species differences in kinetics can occur.
In summary our findings indicate that the habitat segregation commonly observed for meadow voles and prairie voles results primarily from species differences in habitat tolerance, with interspecific competition playing a lesser but reinforcing role.
These include description of important species differences, with special attention to the horse and cow; the addition of a new chapter on poultry; the addition of 60 new line drawings as well as radiographic images to illustrate anatomical features; greater emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms in physiological processes; highlighted clinical extracts; and a glossary of commonly used abbreviations.
Boss Jan said: "At the end of 10 years' research, the scientists admitted they had difficulty applying their data to humans because of 'remarkable species differences'.
To get a better understanding of the poor establishment of Kentucky bluegrass in species mixtures, it is relevant to distinguish between species differences in germination rate, pre-emergence seedling growth rate, and post-emergence seedling growth rate.
Morphological differences in haliotid sperm are discussed in relation to species differences in fertilization kinetics.
Statistical analyses of the heating data indicated significant species differences for heating time to 56[degrees]C, with white oak stringers heating faster than red oak stringers but not yellow-poplar stringers.
Such transmission would be rare because of species differences and the low transmissibility of LDV.