species


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species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

/spe·cies/ (spe´shēz) a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety.
type species  the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.

species (Sp)

[spē′sēz, spē′shēz] pl. species (sp., spp.)
Etymology: L, form
the category of living things below genus in rank. A species is a genetically distinct group of demes that share a common gene pool and are reproductively isolated from all other such groups. See also deme, genus.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.

species

a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphological and physiological characteristics, the important one of which is that they are capable of interbreeding to produce fertile and viable offspring.

species difference
the difference between species in their response to therapeutic agents, poisons and infections due to physical, biochemical, immunological differences.
species specialist
a veterinarian who specializes in the diseases and management of an individual animal species.
type species
the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not only does each species preserve its characteristics, but it also receives Divine command (wahy) and acts accordingly, the Qur'an tells us.
The upper-alpine species shared some DNA variations with Lycaeides idas from wet meadows on the western slopes of the mountains, and it has wing patterns like those of Lycaeides melissa from the drier eastern slopes.
ENM can be used to identify potential distributional areas on any landscape: unsampled or unstudied portions of the native landscape, areas of actual or potential invasion by a species with an expanding range, or changing potential distributional areas as a consequence of change (e.
One of Fisher's favorite finds is the Dracula ant, a new species, in the genus Mystrium.
A law called the Endangered Species Act (ESA) also helped.
This approach pioneered by Ludvigsen in the 1970s, and rests on the assumption that all species of each genus would have had the same ecological requirements, more or less.
Three rubber-producing species of higher plant were chosen from different Super Orders of the Dicotyledoneae to reflect as distant a phylogenetic relationship as possible.
She said many of the trade group's members have faced litigation, despite their willingness to work with state and federal agencies to preserve endangered species.
Robinson's Kokias, however, flowered prolifically producing hundreds of viable seeds, which he germinated and used to begin growing another crop of the rare species.
We just thought it fit the Endangered Species Act as well as some of the other species that have been listed," Gardner says.
While scientists aren't sure how many species inhabit the planet today, their estimates top ten million.
Gassman, who leads birding tours, says that Hawaii's native species fell victim to many predators, beginning with the rats that stowed away in canoes with early Polynesian settlers.