species


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species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Gompert and his colleagues did extensive genetic work on the three Sierra Nevada species. The pattern of markers and sequenced genes best fit the scenario of the high-alpine lineage arising from the other two species and later following its own evolutionary path, the researchers say in a paper that Science has posted online.
In many cases, the details of ecologic parameters associated with occurrences of diseases or of species participating in disease transmission (e.g., vectors, hosts, pathogens) may be unclear because of small sample sizes, biased reporting, or simply lack of detailed geographic or ecologic analysis.
Fisher discovered another new species when he hacked into a log and a swarm of ants ran up his arm and started stinging him.
Organizations such as Earthjustice sometimes go to court to stop construction projects if scientists believe that development will put an endangered species at risk.
(Biodiversity refers to a great number of plant and animal species living in a particular environment.)
The historically minded geologist is in his/her element because the synonymies and discussion of each species present a wide-ranging, quasi-legal and historical justification for the pedigree of all species.
In all three species, polymerization rate is affected by both the concentration and size of the initiator and by the concentration of the monomer (ref.
If the climate changes, industry, government and communities may want to decide changing the forest composition by bringing in high-value, adaptive species that can survive in mild winters.
John Fay, a botanist with the Endangered Species Office in Washington, D.C., who toured Robinson's reserve at the end of the 1980s, said of him: "Robinson was the only steward of 16 or 17 endangered species.
While scientists aren't sure how many species inhabit the planet today, their estimates top ten million.
(Captive breeding efforts are underway, but only two 'alalas remain in the wild.) Gassman, who leads birding tours, says that Hawaii's native species fell victim to many predators, beginning with the rats that stowed away in canoes with early Polynesian settlers.