special interest

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special interest

A UK term for a focused interest and expertise in a medically qualified doctor in addition to his or her specialty, as would be an anaesthetist with a special interest in pulmonary hypertension. Special interests may be developed by the doctor even in absence of a recognised sub-specialty.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Iron Triangle of elected officials, bureaucrats, and special-interest groups tends to "warp planning to their own ends rather than to the public interests."
BE: Political observers say Republican Party appeals to race and opposition to taxes and "special-interest groups" have wooed white, mostly male moderates and conservatives.
(2) Should political campaigns be financed exclusively with government money to remove special-interest influence?
That's what This Old House magazine is banking on with the latest in its new special-interest publication program.
Nader accepted the invitation, promising to use the California platform to expose "the corrosive impact of special-interest money" and to build "a catalyst for the creation of a new model for electoral politics."
Second, strong parties can shield lawmakers from the very special-interest influence that many accuse them of surrendering to.
Earned $2.7 million in speaking fees, much of it from special-interest groups, in two years after leaving Senate.
Some retailers could say: 'That is a little too specialized for my audience.' " Joe Pagano, merchandise manager in charge of home video for Best Buy, said that, although special-interest tapes generally are strongly performing, documentaries in particular "are not a significant part of our business." Documentaries -- and how-to tapes -- constitute less than 1 percent of Best Buy's video business, according to Pagano.
For example, Congress does not normally delegate its authority to tax; still, few would argue that the tax code is less of a special-interest circus than any regulatory program.
More and more narrowly defined special-interest groups are springing up in Washington, complete with a full array of lobbyists, lawyers, influence peddlers, and PACs, to defend and improve upon their government subsidies, tax breaks, trade preferences, and rigged deals.
Similarly, Sorauf concedes that the dominance of special-interest money is at least seen as a problem by the public.

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