spearing

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Jabbing/stabbing an opponent with a hockey stick blade, which carries an automatic major penalty and game misconduct
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

spearing

Sports medicine–ice hockey A penalty which occurs when a player illegally jabs, or attempts to jab, his stick blade into another player's body. See Sports medicine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
There he chose twelve shields, with as many helmets and spears, and brought them back as fast as he could to give them to the suitors.
And the Centaurs were gathered against them on the other side with Petraeus and Asbolus the diviner, Arctus, and Ureus, and black-haired Mimas, and the two sons of silver, and they had pinetrees of gold in their hands, and they were rushing together as though they were alive and striking at one another hand to hand with spears and with pines.
"There is this to choose," I answered; "perish on the spears of our people or try the river."
They tried to kill him with spears and kerries, but he jumped round them, biting at them, and kept them back.
Or, by some genius of memory, to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft.
It was at this time, a year before, that young Spear picked the spring flowers to take to his mother.
At that rate, keeping Spear out of prison would cost a thousand dollars.
He knew he could not escape recognition, his face was too well known, but, he trusted, for the sake of Spear, the reporters would make no display of his visit.
Thorndike is interested in Henry Spear, coming up for sentence in Part Three this morning.
At the instant that he felt the spear come away from Ja's hand the creature must have opened his huge jaws to catch me, for when I came down, still clinging to the butt end of the weapon, the point yet rested in his mouth and the result was that the sharpened end transfixed his lower jaw.
I fell upon his snout, lost my hold upon the spear, rolled the length of his face and head, across his short neck onto his broad back and from there to the ground.
A glance over my shoulder showed me the sithic engaged in pawing at the spear stuck through his lower jaw, and so busily engaged did he remain in this occupation that I had gained the safety of the cliff top before he was ready to take up the pursuit.