spatial

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spatial

 [spa´shal]
pertaining to space.

spa·tial

(spā'shăl), Avoid the misspelling spacial.
Relating to space or a space.

spatial

/spa·tial/ (spa´shul) pertaining to space.

spa·tial

(spā'shăl)
Relating to space or a space.

spatial

pertaining to space.

spatial clustering
in geographical terms the cases in an outbreak of disease are clustered in groups and not spread randomly.
spatial distribution
the distribution of a population within an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadening spatial consciousness includes considering how arts-based visual methodologies can bring attention to the presence and significance of spatiality in our everyday lives.
To highlight the intrinsic spatiality of texts and their presence in the surrounding urban environment, I introduce the term ambient text.
On the contrary, their roles are the result of the sadistic spatiality which Rivette has created.
The fact that spatiality stems from awareness and perception is related to the fact that, according to Henri Lefebvre (405), "the whole of social space proceeds from the body".
At a fundamental level, the sociality of a Usenet (13) and that of a Twitter is not all that different, confined as they are to the spatiality and territoriality of the Internet.
The material spatiality that defines rural living also masks social problems, many with legal implications.
Moreover, if we regard access to Achilles' state of mind as being problematized in this scene, the move of seeing the passage's spatiality as psychologizing becomes concomitantly difficult.
In Visuality and Spatiality in Virginia Woolf's Fiction, Savina Stevanato takes seriously Maggie Humm's assertion that "Issues of vision and specularity haunt modernity" (1).
Even when serving a multicentric polity like the Achemenid Empire, the political use of spatiality was crucial for the highly ritualised nature of a peripatetic court and as symbol of the Great King's qualities.
The subtitle of the book, "the formation of space and cultural meaning" highlights its main focus, which is a concern with how the morphological characteristics of an artistic creation (be it a building, a museum collection or a story) can be linked to the cultural meanings it evokes through a focus on the concept of spatiality.
Indeed, spatiality seemed a non-question, a matter of study only in mathematics or the physical sciences, and not a question for the humanities.
Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos notes that a spatial turn can be observed in the law that negotiates its turning in ways that move away from spatiality (law's spatial turn promises to bring forth a space within the law): geog- raphy as a discourse can facilitate law's conceptualization of space,3 and space beyond metaphor vies with the traditionally conceived abstraction of the law.