spatial

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spatial

 [spa´shal]
pertaining to space.

spa·tial

(spā'shăl), Avoid the misspelling spacial.
Relating to space or a space.

spatial

/spa·tial/ (spa´shul) pertaining to space.

spa·tial

(spā'shăl)
Relating to space or a space.

spatial

pertaining to space.

spatial clustering
in geographical terms the cases in an outbreak of disease are clustered in groups and not spread randomly.
spatial distribution
the distribution of a population within an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critical Spatiality and related spatial theories, such as the theories of boundaries, analyse how a particular place (and its inherent space) is constructed through the perceptions of it, and attributions made to it in terms of the psychosocial perceptions and understandings of its inhabitants at a given time (Matthews 165-8).
Kestner, The Spatiality of the Novel (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1978), p.
Throughout "The Paperhanger, ambiguity and spatiality coalesce to develop a "sense of an ending" that complicates the possibility of morality or cosmic order in a world that both Gay and O'Connor, for shared and different reasons, find "almost rotten" but possibly not beyond grace.
Whether a regime is traditional-hierarchical, rational-bureaucratic or a complex mixture of factors, spatiality is of even greater importance in the existence of a modern nation state.
So it seems that the spatiality of the scene produces gendered performance while gendered performances simultaneously produce the spatiality of the scene.
At the same time, it is worth noting a bit of caution toward completely divorcing the idea of spatiality from publicity, a definite risk in a move toward hyper-publicity.
And maybe having to bring them together was the basis of figuring out what a new kind of spatiality could be.
As such, when meaning of place experience is interpreted in relation to spatiality, it is crucial to examine the potential metaphysicality of space as well as the influence of spatial physicality, and this is to be cross-referenced to other lifeworld existentials (for instance, see Thrift, 1993 for the inseparability of space-time).
Kelly might well have devoted more space, as it were, to teasing out her fundamental distinction between spatiality (the real or imagined space in which a literary work takes place) and place (space invested with human meaning).
The political ramifications of spatiality have been addressed by numerous theorists (Bourdieu, Lefebvre and Foucault).
Analysis of spatiality in this branch of research is largely limited to the notion of territoriality, which is most closely connected with research into nationalism and is linked to the concept of the nation-state.
And 'being' refers to the self that can be only a part of this spatiality and may try to accept and understand it rather than to recreate it.