spatial

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spatial

 [spa´shal]
pertaining to space.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spa·tial

(spā'shăl), Avoid the misspelling spacial.
Relating to space or a space.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spa·tial

(spā'shăl)
Relating to space or a space.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the spatial narrative is about today's people and their living conditions, to be specific, Fang believes that the spatial narrative contains the following three aspects: 1) occasionality of life; 2) momentariness of reality; 3) spatiality of existence (149).
She admired the book for bringing into discussion many serious and sensitive issues related with fiction and cultural spatiality and becoming a local vocal contrary to the foreign voice.
Beyond the immediate field, however, the volume also contributes to theoretical and political discussions around central issues within ethnographic research, such as spatiality, temporality, positionality and difference.
Further considerations of spatiality outside of the field of geography, in this case, in higher education research are needed.
She will talk of 'power geometries' ('Imagining globalization') and the 'global sense of place' (see Marxism Today article) or even 'the sphere of the possibility of the existence of multiplicity' ('Philosophy and politics of spatiality'), often with a poetic quality in the unexpected juxtaposition of words.
This theoretical framework rests on a discussion about space and spatiality. As was said in relation to the concept of border, the author considers the spatiality in which people live to exceed geographical space or the physical world; in that way, the border can be in a different place than the boundary between countries.
Ambient text, social space, space of flows, spatiality, materiality, linguistic landscape
Lefebvre's theory of spatiality famously proposed that space itself is socially produced, in what Edward Soja referred to as a "trialectical" process involving the interplay between direct experience, institutionalized representations, and the self-made (or lived) representations of individuals.
(14) Still, taking into account the analysis developed in the previous section, we could ask whether the awakening of sadistic feelings and attitudes (contrary to the Christian spirit) in the Mother Superior Sainte-Christine and the sisters of the convent of Longchamp can be uniquely explained with reference to the milieu (the sadistic spatiality mentioned above) or whether there is an element peculiar to religious practice which may favor the emergence of sadistic behaviors.
Like this, the screen operates as a material condition of the architectural cinema through which Kael would generate her eroticism of like and un-alike publics (plural, relational corporealities) energized by a spatiality itself tensed through interior, exterior, national and international domains.
Following the literary and historical contextualisation of the novel, a theoretical overview is provided that sketches existing research on Agaat, the concepts of Critical Spatiality, Thirding-as-Othering, and the body in space.