variable

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variable

 [var´e-ah-b'l]
something that changes; an attribute or property of a person, event, or object that is known to vary in a given study.
dependent variable in a mathematical equation or relationship between two or more variables, a variable whose value depends on those of others; it represents a response, behavior, or outcome that the researcher wishes to predict or explain.
extraneous variable a factor that is not itself under study but affects the measurement of the study variables or the examination of their relationships.
independent variable in a mathematical equation or relationship between two or more variables, any variable whose value determines that of others; it represents the treatment or experimental variable that is manipulated by the researcher to create an effect on the dependent variable.

var·i·a·ble

(var'ē-ă-bĕl),
1. That which is inconstant, which can or does change, as contrasted with a constant.
2. Deviating from the type in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
[L. vario, to vary, change, differ]

variable

(vâr′ē-ə-bəl, văr′-)
adj.
1.
a. Likely to change or vary; subject to variation; changeable.
b. Inconstant; fickle.
2. Biology Tending to exhibit genetic variation or variation in a physical trait: geographically variable color patterns.
3. Mathematics Having no fixed quantitative value.
n.
Something that varies or is prone to variation.

var′i·a·ble·ness n.
var′i·a·bly adv.

variable

(1) Any attribute, phenomenon or event that can have different qualitative or quantitative values. Typically, a form of metadata goes with the variable, there is a variable definition that describes what is varying and there is a value for the variable. Variables are typically assessed in a clinical trial. 
(2) In Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM), variables describe observations with roles that determine the type of information conveyed by the variable about each observation and how it can be used.

In SDTM, variables include specific subtypes used in clinical research: "study variable" in trial design refers to a variable to be captured on the case record form (CRF); an "assessment" is a study variable pertaining to the status of a subject/patient, is usually measured at a certain time and is usually not compounded significantly by combining several simultaneous measurements to form a derived assessment (e.g., BMI, or a result of statistical analysis); an "endpoint" is a variable that pertains to the trial objectives.

variable

noun Epidemiology Any characteristic or attribute that can be measured. See Confounding variable, Continuous variable, Dependent variable, Independent variable, Instrumental variable, Intervening variable, Lurking variable, Natural variable, Predictor variable, Qualitative variable, Quantitative variable, Random variable.

var·i·a·ble

(var'ē-ă-bĕl)
1. That which is inconstant, which can or does change, as contrasted with a constant.
2. Deviating from the type in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
[L. vario, to vary, change, differ]

var·i·a·ble

(var'ē-ă-bĕl)
That which is inconstant, which can or does change, as contrasted with a constant.
[L. vario, to vary, change, differ]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the coming result, we will assume that the variable coefficient [beta] has a global exponential decay of the form (7), in its Fourier transform with respect to the spatial variable. More concretely, we set the following class of functions
Similar to hand-delineated maps, optimal prediction maps of categorical spatial variables normally also have an omission effect: minor classes are underrepresented because of their lower occurrence probabilities at most unsampled locations and major classes are consequently over-represented [20, 38].
Plot and landscape factors had the largest total effects (23.8%) and pure effects (19.7%), respectively, but spatial variables had the fewest total and pure effects (13.1%, 11.2%).
Because there was no significant variation in fish assemblage structure among the ECOSAR cruises (Table 5), data from all cruises were pooled to produce only one model for assessing the relationship between the variability in the assemblage structure and the oceanographic and spatial variables. The most parsimonious model was formed of 2 spatial variables: distance from shore and [Z.sub.a] (Table 7).
The Shannon index, species richness and abundance responded to bioclimatic and spatial variables. This supports the results of recent studies that have shown a relationship between these biodiversity indices and environmental gradients in the Neotropical region (e.g., Suriano et al., 2011).
Accordingly, we evaluated the partial derivatives of the Green's function with respect to the antenna spatial variables, namely, [rho] and [theta].
We firstly dicretize the spatial variables by a fourth order compact difference scheme.
Based on these results, it appears that utilising spatial variables such as distance to the coast in addition to a comprehensive classification of view can add significantly to the estimation of residential property values.
In such simulation fields, a classical analysis technique based on tables and statistical graphs is too limited for spatial analysis: no spatial analysis (e.g., correlation between spatial variables), no spatial visualization, no map-based or cartographical exploration of spatial data (which is relevant to reveal clusters, the proximity between two phenomena or the spatial area of a phenomenon), etc.
In addition to environmental variables, spatial variables also explained a significant amount of variation.
In the previous section it was shown that the ability for an OLS model to satisfactorily predict residential property values could be reduced to the problem of specifying spatial variables that capture externalities associated with different locations in the urban fabric.
While this restriction applies to many interesting biological variables, for some questions we need techniques for analyzing both discrete and continuous, metric as well as nominal, spatial variables. The use of metric variables may increase the sensitivity for detecting spatial pattern; for example, the apparent lack of spatial aggregation in diseased Silene disappears when a metric analysis is used.

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