spatial disorientation


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spatial disorientation

In aerospace medicine, a term used to describe a variety of incidents occurring in flight, when the pilot fails to sense correctly the position, motion, or attitude of the aircraft or himself or herself within the coordinate system provided by the surface of the earth and gravitation.
See also: disorientation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
With a view to better understanding the problems facing astronauts, the researchers are building on information from Small's previous studies of spatial disorientation for the U.S.
Spatial disorientation and dysfunction of orientation/equilibrium reflexes: Aeromedical evaluation and considerations.
Spatial disorientation occurs because humans can't fly: Our sensory apparatus simply isn't designed for the task, so we are susceptible to long lists of physiological and optical illusions that regularly lead to not knowing which side is up.
And Maj Hammond said there was no evidence of spatial disorientation.
In Spatial Disorientation, the plane and the modernist monolith that it seems to be crashing into are the only objects in the frame.
Contributing to the accident were the pilot's spatial disorientation and the operation of the vacuum pump beyond the 6-year time limit recommended by the vacuum pump manufacturer."
Not all Airmen have been as fortunate to encounter and then overcome spatial disorientation at night.
Conditions conducive to spatial disorientation are: (May have multiple answers.)
Perhaps this is what Ocker was referring to as "not natural." Naval Safety Center data shows that spatial disorientation is still the leading aeromedical causal factor of Class A mishaps.
The salient indications that a cat is experiencing this condition include spatial disorientation; wandering in unfamiliar territory; diminished playfulness; excessive sleeping; shifting cycles of sleep and wakefulness; long periods of staring into space or at walls; indifference to food and water; sudden, prolonged and seemingly unprompted vocalization; and elimination outside the litter box.
Florence's Sadean blueprint, plagiarizing the most inhumane features of California's notorious Pelican Bay facility, is explicitly intended to maximize sensory deprivation and spatial disorientation. Seven layers of three-inch-thick steel doors and 1,400 electronic gates control movement within the 562-bed labyrinth.

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