contiguity

(redirected from spatial contiguity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

con·ti·gu·i·ty

, spatial contiguity (kon'ti-gyū'i-tē),
1. Contact without actual continuity, for example, the contact of the bones entering into the formation of a cranial suture. Compare: continuity.
2. Occurrence of two or more objects, events, or mental impressions together in space (spatial contiguity) or time (temporal contiguity).
[L. contiguus, touching, fr. contingo, to touch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

con·ti·gu·i·ty

(kon'ti-gyū'i-tē)
1. Contact without structural continuity, e.g., the contact of the bones entering into the formation of a cranial suture.
Compare: continuity
2. Occurrence of two or more objects, events, or mental impressions together in space or time.
[L. contiguus, touching, fr. contingo, to touch]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

con·ti·gu·i·ty

(kon'ti-gyū'i-tē)
Contact without actual continuity.
[L. contiguus, touching, fr. contingo, to touch]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One animal did so at a high level even without the gradual dissociation of stimuli and response loci, and 2 others showed fairly high performance for some lever positions even though 1 of those 2 did not make the immediate leap from spatial contiguity to extreme spatial discontiguity and had to be given one more step in the progression.
Spatial contiguity of cue, reward, and response in discrimination learning by children.
An analysis of the importance of S-R spatial contiguity for proficient primate discrimination performance.
Rather, spatial contiguity is taken as an indicator of an important external influence on the size of state interest-systems.
The first compares Lowery and Gray's ESA model with four models emphasizing some aspect of region or spatial contiguity as independent explanations.
The remaining two models speak less to spatial contiguity as a direct or indirect measure of variables presumed to operate within each state than to actual processes of interaction among the states, including diffusion, contagion, and/or emulation.
Indeed, a number of recent studies have reported that spatial contiguity readily leads to the formation of equivalence classes in both adults and children (see Leader & Barnes, 1996; Leader, Barnes-Holmes, & Smeets, 2000).
It appears, therefore, that removing the confounding variable of spatial contiguity from the current study facilitated derived relational responding.
One can not be certain that the spatial contiguity between stimuli introduced during training for Experiment 2 was actually responsible for the somewhat stronger stimulus association effects obtained afterwards.

Full browser ?