spargana

spargana

 [spahr´gah-nah]
plural of sparganum.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
After entry into humans, the plerocercoid larvae (spargana) migrate to different anatomic locations, where they cause space-occupying lesions as they develop into adults.
According to a 2009 survey, >25% of the local wild frogs were infected with spargana (2).
Genome DNA was extracted from individual spargana by SDS/proteinase K treatment, column-puried (Wizard SV Genomic DNA Purication System, Promega) and eluted into 60 uL H2O according to the manufacturer recommendations (Zhao et al., 2009a, b).
Spargana of Spirometra can parasitize in human body and result in sparganosis, which is an important foodborne parasitic zoonosis [1].
The purpose of this study was to assess the risks of human spargana infection caused by the consumption of wild-caught snakes and provide scientific foundation for preventing the human sparganosis.
Sparganosis is an infection caused by the plerocercoid larvae (spargana) of various diphyllobothroid tapeworms belonging to the genus Spirometra.
Spargana infection in frogs of genus Pristimantis (Anura, Strabomantidae) from Peru
To the Editor: Sparganosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by invasion of the spargana, the plerocercoid larvae of various diphyllobothroid tapeworms belonging to the genus Spirometra (1).
To assess the risk for human infection with sparganosis in this province and to strengthen public safety awareness, we investigated spargana infection in the animal hosts of Spirometra tapeworms.
To the Editor: Sparganosis is a worldwide parasitic zoonosis caused by infection with spargana, the plerocercoid larvae of various diphyllobothroid tapeworms belonging to the genus Spirometra (1-3).
Persons in Guangdong Province eat frog meat and place frog poultices made from raw frog meat on open wounds and lesions, which facilitates human infection with spargana. To assess the risk for human infection with sparganosis in this province and to strengthen public food safety awareness, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of spargana infection in frogs, the second intermediate host of Spirometra.
showed this dot immunogold filtration assay for sparganosis mansoni has light cross-reactivity to clonorchiasis (8%) and serious cross-reactivity to paragonimiasis (52%).[6] Although Spirometra mansoni spargana could parasitize in many different human tissues, the parasitizing in lung is infrequent.[7] What's most important is that sparganosis mansoni is usually caused by the ingestion of raw meat of frogs or snakes.[7]