space-occupying lesion


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space-occupying lesion

Hematology A lesion that replaces BM, alters its architecture and/or depresses marrow production, resulting in myelophthisic anemia; most SOLs are due to metastases from 1º CAs of lung, breast, prostate, thyroid, adrenals, but may be due to myeloma, leukemia, lymphoma, osteosclerosis, myelofibrosis; all 3 blood cell lines are affected; immature RBCs and WBCs appear in peripheral circulation, due to irritation phenomena. See Myelofibrosis. Myelophthisic anemia
References in periodicals archive ?
For seminal vesicle-derived tumours, pelvic cavity CT and MRI have significant advantages for determining the origin and extent of space-occupying lesions and whether they have invaded adjacent tissues.
Although a heterogeneous space-occupying lesion may be detected in US, CT should be carried out in order to define the hemorrhagic component with its heterogeneous hyperdense appearance (4).
In patients taken to neurosurgery with a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage or space-occupying lesion, the development of hyponatremia suggests an unfavorable neurological outcome, with no circumstantial effect on mortality.
ICP monitoring alone cannot absolutely ensure early detection of the contralateral space-occupying lesion after DC due to improvement in cerebral compliance.
The imaging differential diagnosis of epidural, space-occupying lesions includes both tumor lesions and nontumorous lesions mimicking tumors.
(8) Additionally, any space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum can produce symptoms of superior vena cava syndrome (headache, dyspnea, edema head/ neck/forearm).
In the MRI examination (Achieva 3T, Philips AG, 8027 Zurich, Switzerland) of the spine, a small (4.5-mm diameter), tubular, space-occupying lesion was identified at the cervical intervertebral disk space 6/7 on the left side of the spinal cord.
Even in the context of an abnormal neurologic exam, "'only 4% have a space-occupying lesion, and most of them will also have an abnormal neurologic exam.
"He did an assessment and he said 'I think you have a space-occupying lesion,' which as a nurse I thought could be a brain tumour.
At posterior rhinoscopy there was visualized 4x6.5 cm reddish space-occupying lesion, with smooth surface overlapping 2/3 of both choanae.
Compressive atelectasis develops with any space-occupying lesion such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, or abdominal distention.

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