soy foods

soy foods

Foods—e.g., miso, soybeans, soy milk, textured vegetable protein, tempeh, tofu produced from soy (Glycine hispida)—which are high in protein and contain isoflavones (e.g., genistine) as well as phytosterols and phytooestrogens. Soy foods may protect against cancer, especially of the breast, as well as the colon and prostate. Soy is thought to be the most effective food for reducing cholesterol.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 66mg of isoflavone that we use in this study is equivalent to eating an oriental diet, which is rich in soy foods.
The Whole Soy Foods segment was the largest segment in 2013, accounting for more than 50 percent of the market.
In our study, 82 women consumed a diet containing either two servings of soy foods each day or less than three servings a week, and they ate each diet for six months," she notes.
Long celebrated as a health food staple, this ubiquitous legume has been facing serious health questions--such as whether eating soy foods can affect your hormones or even increase your chances of breast cancer.
Soy foods have been variously lauded and vilified for their link to various cancers, particularly hormonally-related cancers such as prostate, breast and endometrial cancer.
Washington, May 9 ( ANI ): Tomatoes and soy foods, when eaten together, could be more effective in preventing prostate cancer than when either of them is eaten alone, a study has claimed.
and China to examine the use of soy foods after women were diagnosed with breast cancer.
Editor's Note: While unfermented soy foods were associated with a protective effect, fermented foods such as miso were not.
Focusing on the bright side, Joe Jordan, content director, Soyatech, Southwest Harbor, ME, pointed out, "While the overall industry has been stuck in neutral since 2004, it has become increasingly clear that soy foods are not monolithic.
But before you dump out all your soy foods, note that the operative phrase here is "large amounts" which, in laboratory science, can mean amounts substantially above what one would consume in real life.
The women who ate the most soy foods had a 29% lower risk of death and a 32% lower recurrence of breast cancer than those who ate the least soy.
More than 5,000 women with breast cancer were examined over an average of four years after diagnosis in order to determine the association between soy foods and cancer recurrence and death.