sound therapy


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Related to sound therapy: Music therapy

sound therapy

Fringe medicine
The use of sound as a therapeutic modality, which is linked to the release of hormones and other factors, including the so-called harmonic factor. Sound therapy is said to affect physiologic parameters, including breathing and heart rate, blood pressure and neuromuscular tone, and is allegedly useful in Alzheimer’s disease, hospice environments for the terminally ill, childbirth, dentistry and psychotherapy. Some sound therapists use handheld devices to apply sounds directly to the body surface, a practice of questionable efficacy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe cases may also be referred to tinnitus retraining therapy, which uses sound therapy to help reduce the perceived loudness of the ringing, roaring or whistling.
The treatment, in question, uses a combination of light and sound therapy to treat the disease in a non-invasive manner.
It is a practical implementation of neurophysiological model of tinnitus that includes counseling and sound therapy (aided or unaided).
Tuning the Human Biofield: Healing With Vibrational Sound Therapy by Eileen Day McKusick; www.eileenmckusick.com
CLASS: British national Natalie gets ready for a sound therapy class.
Sound therapy 69% CBT 67% No treatment 39% Anti-anxiety/Anti-depressive 31% treatment Alternative medicine 27% Neck/TMJ physiotherapy 14% Ginko Biloba 10% Gabapentin 4% Note: Table made from bar graph.
As an alternative form of sound therapy, the authors recommend exploring the use of structured sounds--such as music and speech--to mask or cover the phantom sounds heard in the head by tinnitus patients.
"In the '80s, clients were treated like patients in a hospital," said Ilse Achterberg, a former occupational therapist, who was one of the pioneers of "snoezel" rooms, which feature light, aroma, massage and sound therapy, and let patients relax and access emotions that are often blocked in stressful clinical settings.
Many approaches, including pharmacological therapy [24, 25], acupuncture [26], brain stimulation [27, 28], cognitive-behavioral therapy [29], and sound therapy [13, 30-33], have been attempted in order to reduce the phantom auditory sensation; however, their efficiencies currently remain unclear and a standard treatment for tinnitus has not yet been developed [34].
There are ways to cope with tinnitus including sound therapy, listening to neutral sounds to distract you, cognitive behavioral therapy and tinnitus restraining therapy which aims to help retrain the way your brain responds to tinnitus to help you start to tune the sound out.
The group, including 30 children, had therapy sessions of massage, reflexology, sound therapy, sculpture and singing workshops.
Building on his experience in Sound Branding, John Groves spoke of his recent work in healthcare, which included: Auditory navigation for medical equipment, Healing Soundscapes in hospitals, and the development of Receptive Sound Therapy programs for improving sleep, managing stress, and more (http://www.sonictonic.io).