absorption coefficient

(redirected from sound absorption coefficient)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to sound absorption coefficient: Noise Reduction Coefficient

coefficient

 [ko″ĕ-fish´ent]
1. an expression of the change or effect produced by the variation in certain variables, or of the ratio between two different quantities.
2. in chemistry, a number or figure put before a chemical formula to indicate how many times the formula is to be multiplied.
Bunsen coefficient the number of milliliters of gas dissolved in a milliliter of liquid at atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) and a specified temperature. Symbol, α.
confidence coefficient the probability that a confidence interval will contain the true value of the population parameter. For example, if the confidence coefficient is 0.95, 95 per cent of the confidence intervals so calculated for a large number of random samples would contain the parameter.
correlation coefficient a numerical value that indicates the degree and direction of relationship between two variables; the coefficients range in value from +1.00 (perfect positive relationship) to 0.00 (no relationship) to −1.00 (perfect negative or inverse relationship).
diffusion coefficient see diffusion coefficient.
coefficient of digestibility the proportion of a food that is digested compared to what is absorbed, expressed as a percentage.
dilution coefficient a number that expresses the effectiveness of a disinfectant for a given organism. It is calculated by the equation tcn = k, where t is the time required for killing all organisms, c is the concentration of disinfectant, n is the dilution coefficient, and k is a constant. A low coefficient indicates the disinfectant is effective at a low concentration.
linear absorption coefficient the fraction of a beam of radiation absorbed per unit thickness of absorber.
mass absorption coefficient the linear absorption coefficient divided by the density of the absorber.
phenol coefficient see phenol coefficient.
sedimentation coefficient the velocity at which a particle sediments in a centrifuge divided by the applied centrifugal field, the result having units of time (velocity divided by acceleration), usually expressed in Svedberg units (S), which equal 10−13 second. Sedimentation coefficients are used to characterize the size of macromolecules; they increase with increasing mass and density and are higher for globular than for fibrous particles.

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

1. the milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid;
2. the amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law; Compare: specific absorption coefficient.
3. a measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of an x-ray beam in its passage through a substance, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.

Absorption Coefficient

Chemistry The amount, in millilitres (mls), of a gas at a standard temperature and pressure that saturates 100 mls of a liquid.
Physics Wave absorption The amount of energy lost due to scattering—e.g., Compton effect—and conversion to other forms of energy as a wave travels a unit distance.

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(ăb-sōrp'shŭn kō-ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
1. The milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid.
2. The amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law.
3. radiology A measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of a beam in its passage through matter, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.
See also: attenuation

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(ab-sōrp'shŭn kō-ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
1. The milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid.
2. The amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law.
3. radiology a measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of a beam in its passage through matter, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.
See also: attenuation
References in periodicals archive ?
The sound absorption coefficient of epoxy foams blown at different temperatures is shown in Fig.
The mean sound absorption coefficient and the mean sound TL as functions of the foaming temperature are illustrated in Fig.
Hamdan, "Sound absorption coefficients natural fibre reinforced composites," Advanced Materials Research, vol.
Caption: Figure 3: The sound absorption coefficients of composite samples.
In summary, the sound absorption coefficient is associated with the tortuosity fractal dimension, the pore area fractal dimension, and the porosity.
(1) In frequency domain, the sound absorption coefficient increases in 100-2000 Hz and 4000-6400 Hz range but decreases in 2000-4000 Hz range.
Sound Absorption Coefficient of the Sound-Absorbing Slab.
This value is an average value of sound absorption coefficients at frequencies of 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz.
These measurements proved that with increasing thickness the sound absorption coefficient is improved mainly at frequency range f = 500Hz to f = 2500Hz.
For determination of sound absorption coefficient 4 series of specimens were used.
One of the most important acoustic properties is sound absorption coefficient. The sound absorption coefficient ([alpha]) describes the efficiency of the material or surface to absorb sound energy and can take values in the range 0-1, where 1 represents total absorption and 0 represents total reflection.
[alpha] = Average sound absorption coefficient for the walls