sorb

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sorb

 [sorb]
to attract and retain substances by absorption or adsorption.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [C.sub.0] and [C.sub.e] are the initial and equilibrium concentrations of the dyes in the solution, respectively, in mg x [l.sup.-1]; V is model solution volume, in l; and m is the mass of sorbent sample, in g.
After leaving the dialyzer, dialysate flows through a series of three sorbent cartridges that adsorb ammonium, small and medium-size solutes, and organic compounds.
The raw materials for sorbent fabrication, zirconium(IV) sulfate (Zr[(S[O.sub.4]).sub.2]), iron(II) chloride (Fe[Cl.sub.2] x 4[H.sub.2]O), and iron(III) chloride (Fe[Cl.sub.3] x 6[H.sub.2]O), were obtained from SigmaAldrich Co.
The Polypropylene SPE tube (3mL) used for packing the sorbent and the PE Frit (20 [micro]m) were all obtained from Shanghai ANPEL Laboratory Technologies.
Zeolite 13X (1-3 pm particles, Sigma-Aldrich) and high-silica ZSM-5 (Si:Al ratio of 40, [approximately equal to]2[micro]m crystals) were used as the sorbent material.
Designed with a combination of proprietary recombinant ligand and a highly cross-linked cellulose base matrix, the new KANEKA KanCapA 3G sorbent exhibits enhanced binding capacity, an excellent elution profile as well as an advanced impurity removal properties when compared with other market sorbents.
SEM results exhibited presence of cylindrical cavities on sorbent surface, endorsing viability of sorbent for the removal of Cd2+.
The sorbent material was mixed with 100 mL of artificially contaminated water, containing 10.9, 16.5, 80.6, 346.4, 2732.5, and 5286 [micro]g/L of arsenic at pH 7.
To explore the appropriate adsorbent, it is necessary to establish equilibrium correlation of sorbent to predict behavior of sorbent under different experimental conditions.
The interaction between sorbent and sorbate is generally seen in the contact time needed to remove the sorbate from water.
The maximum sorption was observed on adding 0.03 to 0.05 g mL-1 sorbent at pH 2 at 200 rpm for 2 hr shaking time.
The present study describes the sequestering of metal ions by exploiting a low cost biomaterial derived from Tribulus tresstris as sorbent. The batch equilibrium studies have been carried out both with raw and chemically/thermally treated biomaterial as a function of pH, contact time, shaking speed and shaking time to decide the effectiveness of biosorbent.