sonorant


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Related to sonorant: obstruent

sonorant

See voiced.
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The data indicate that the liquids were treated in conjunction with nasals, within the sonorant class, liquids showed a lower percentage of wrong answers (18.
While her lines obey the metrical standards of iambic tetrameter, the insistent alliteration of her words, bristling with fricatives, plosives, and sonorants, further emphasizes the aggressive force of her argument.
80), these cases differ in that, with the first pair, both orders put a bilabial in the shunned non-initial syllable, but for t-n the coronal sonorant appears in the preferred non-initial position.
For example, in the Khwarshi noun kad 'girl' a sonorant is inserted into the root.
Since the sequences in question always cross a syllable boundary, and since an obvious difference between stops and fricatives is the difference in sonority, we may look to the Syllable Contact Law (Murray and Vennemann 1983; Vennemann 1988), which requires an onset consonant to be less sonorant than a preceding coda consonant, to provide an answer.
In Paradise Lost, Milton associates this voiced, sonorant, bilabial glide with its alliterative "w" sounds with the fractured, fallen state that all creatures must endure.
The most accurate description of this difference runs as follows: "Overall, the rhythmical character of the first version is marked by the emphasis on and pauses after 'shun' and 'heaven,' whereas the relative lack of pausing and the holding of the reverberations of final consonants so that they flow into the next word makes the second version more even and sonorant.
The sonorant r is voiced and implies the fullness of roundness, resonant-e, and rolling.
Liquid "l," alveolar sonorant, flowing into bilabial voiced stop "b," and forming eventually into labiodental voiceless spirant "f," the word sounds the rhythm by which the world ceaselessly hums.
Gussmann 1991; Giegerich 1999; Toft 2002), according to which word-final syllabic sonorants are to be represented as a single segment attached to a final sonorant consonant and a preceding epenthetic vocalic element.
For example in North-East Late Common Slavonic the constraints were maximal syllable weight and the moraicity of sonorant consonants with no reference to the No Coda constraint, while in the South-Central Late Common Slavonic dialects the No Coda constraint was ranked high.
One of the most effective vocal devices we have encountered in the readings of other readers is what Gerry Knowles ("Pitch Contours") has called "late peaking," that is, when the intonation peak hits the syllable nucleus later than in the middle or even on the following continuant, usually a sonorant.