sonicate

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sonicate

 [son´ĭ-kāt]
1. to expose to sound waves; to disrupt bacteria by exposure to high-frequency sound waves.
2. the products of such disruption.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

son·i·cate

(son'i-kāt),
To expose a suspension of cells or microbes to the disruptive effect of the energy of high frequency sound waves.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sonicate

(sŏn′ĭ-kāt) [L. sonus, sound]
To expose to sound waves.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Patient discussion about sonicate

Q. do you know what are the pros and cons of the Sonic toothbrush from Oral B (electric tooth brush)? last night, my best friend raved about it for a whole hour. My dentist told me to use a soft brush (number 35) to clean my teeth and that the electric brushes are a bit over rated. My friend specifically told me about the Sonic product and told me that it also makes his teeth whiter. I wanted to know if anybody has any knowledge or experience from first hand about this product or any good information about it.

A. Thank you for the frank answer. I wonder if I can find a really soft electric toothbrush

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References in periodicals archive ?
Emergency stop button that shuts down sonication and calls for help is given to the patient EMLA: eutectic mixture of local anesthetics; mg: milligram; dl: deciliter; ml: milliliter; l: liter; min: minute.
Patient in case 5 was treated in 1 h 15 min, using 31 sonications with an energy range of 1051-446 J using small, large, and elongated spots.
We included patients with less than 6 clinically significant submucosal, intramural, and/or subserosal fibroids greater than 3 cm (since the smaller sonication spot with our MRgFUS system is 2.5 cm; see asterisks in Figure 1(a)) and smaller than 10 cm (to avoid longer treatment time; Figure 1(b)).
As a safety measure, a "stop sonication button" is placed in patient's hand and one more button is available on the workstation that the operating physician uses during treatment.
In our practice, the average treatment time (from the first low-energy sonication to the last therapeutic one) was about 150 minutes.
Sonication of VX2 tumours resulted in accurate and spatially homogenous temperature control in the target region.
The authors used immunoelectron microscopy to identify tight junctional proteins such as occludin, claudin-1, claudin-5, and submembranous ZO-1 after sonication. They found substantial redistribution and loss of occludin, claudin-5 and ZO-1.
Prior to each sonication, AP-1 Lipo-Dox or unconjugated LipoDox were administered intravenously, and the concentration in the brain was quantified.
Hynynen, "Focused-ultrasound disruption of the blood-brain barrier using closely-timed short pulses: influence of sonication parameters and injection rate," Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, vol.