somnambulism

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Related to somnambulists: somnambulism

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]
References in periodicals archive ?
?The Somnambulists will be shown at 9pm on Tuesday, February 21, at the GFT as part of Glasgow Film Festival.
Her clairvoyance corresponds to the abilities of another character, a female somnambulist who possesses extensive knowledge when in a trance (348).
It suggests that we are all somnambulists who mistake the narcotics of routinized sleep as wakefulness where we can exercise our freedom.
The individual and society in general were converted into drugged somnambulists, while thefts of epic proportion took place and the weak and old fell into unimagined misery.
They seek the greatest beauty at the very place where it is not to be found, to wit, the extremely high register, or at the end of the fingerboard; they climb about in the high register like somnambulists upon the rooftops, and meanwhile neglect the truly beautiful, depriving the instrument of the gravity and agreeableness which the thick strings are capable of giving it.(36)
The big premiere, Catherine Diverres's fruits, was the usual mish mash of rehearsal workshop material and unreconciled staging ideas: fire, flowers, buckets of water, a chicken, women walking like somnambulists with their arms outstretched, sudden convulsions, long pauses, much falling to the floor.
This lack of connection of information with motivation is also found in other complex but stereotyped chains of behaviour in unconscious subjects such as somnambulists, and contrasts with the subconscious acquisition of information in conscious, neurologically intact people.
So even if we accepted Moore's quite implausible suggestion that apparent references to persons may really be references to a different object of reference, namely a body, we would be very unlikely to pick out the sentences that ascribe, as it seems, actions to somnambulists as introducing that bodily object of reference.
And down the flowered streets saunter all the other spring somnambulists in lightweight clothing, grazing against car bumpers, climbing catwalks of elegance high above downtown Minneapolis, land of cloud-tinted water.
In Josiah McElheny's Projection Painting II, 2015, reworked footage from Maya Deren's unfinished 1951 film Ensemble for Somnambulists is projected on a framed, glass-covered, low-relief prismatic surface so as to be distorted beyond recognition.
An outcome of the intensive debate during the early 2000s in the journal Contemporary Hypnosis was the recommendation that efforts by made to rediscover the type of hypnosis that characterized the somnambulists of Charcot's and Janet's time (Kallio & Revonsuo, 2003, 2005).
In a panel discussion, Reuben Jacob Abraham, from Durham, spoke of returning to India, where he was born, to shoot The Somnambulists, a highly evocative portrait of the Mumbai underworld.