somnambulism


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Related to somnambulism: night terrors

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The history was positive for both a personal and family history of extensive sleep talking and somnambulism.
A source said: "The woman suffers from somnambulism, which means she sometimes sleepwalks in the middle of the night.
While Balzac uses this "tempete sous crane" to preface his discussion of the dangers of somnambulism, Epstein appropriates the scene in order to convey visually the shifts in his protagonist's mental state.
Burdened by traumatic memories, he finds himself roaming around town, feeling haunted, bewitched and scared: "I've walked the city drugged into somnambulism.
Paradoxically, such a divine vision of unity was hard to come by amid the installation's many disparate elements, ranging from a vaguely satanic-looking floor diagram made in collaboration with Simon Moretti and Mai-Thu Perret to botanical models culled from the collections of the Manchester Museum to a hand-carved effigy of a levitating Madame Blavatsky, renowned cofounder of the Theosophical Society--all spiraling around a body of research into Renaissance cosmologies, mysticism and its conflicted relationship with modernism, and, of course, somnambulism.
The starkest example of the second half somnambulism was at QPR when after an industrious first half Boro were blasted apart with two goals in the first five minutes and conceded another soon after.
Just what the troubled Aaron needs; his gran is suffering dementia, he struggles with nightmares and somnambulism (another rare subject in children's fiction) and both are antagonized by low-life neighbours in the caravan park with whom the manager sides in their frequent skirmishes.
Many writers recite evidence of somnambulism to bolster their claims that memory is at once autonomic and physical; the surgeon Walter Cooper Dendy's Philosophy of Mystery (1841), for example, describes a man who writes in his sleep:
Filmed at the New Wimbledon Theatre, Brown uses members of the crowd, as they participate in all manner of experiments and demonstrations, including the Victorian phenomena of somnambulism and the spooky Spirit Cabinet.
For example, in the deep state of hypnosis which is called somnambulism, the hypnotist gives a post-hypnotic suggestion that after hypnosis the subject will not be able to see a specific object.
Brown uses random members of the crowd, as they participate in all manner of experiments and demonstrations, including the Victorian phenomena of somnambulism and the spooky Spirit Cabinet.