somnambulism


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Related to somnambulism: night terrors

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the text goes on, Edgar slowly adopts various characteristics first associated with Clithero, until he ultimately takes on Clithero's somnambulism, waking trapped in a dark cave after a sleepwalking episode.
The sight of a young woman's corpse exacerbates Aaron's harrowing recurrent nightmare, trigger episodes of somnambulism and ultimately open up cathartically his tragic history and the sad circumstances of his daily life which he has been trying to keep private.
From somnambulism to the archetypes: The French roots of Jung's split with Freud.
Books speak in the middle of the night just as the river speaks, quietly and reluctantly, or perhaps the reluctance stems from our own weariness or our own somnambulism and our own dreams, even though we are or believe ourselves to be wide awake.
3) At work in Conrad's novella is, quite literally, an outbreak of such mimetic phenomena: somnambulism, compassion, enthusiasm, emotional contagion, hypnosis, depersonalization and suggestion are all fundamentally mimetic, psychic tendencies that haunt the Conradian conception of the modern subject.
Somnambulism, night terror, confusional arousals, sleep enuresis, RBD and nightmares are some of the parasomnias that can be mistaken for seizures.
Given to somnambulism but not to hallucinations, Donnie, in a deep sleep, is told by a disembodied, synthesized voice to wake up.
According to Wikipedia, sleepwalking -- also called somnambulism or noctambulism -- is a sleep disorder that makes sufferers engage in activities that are normally associated with being awake, while being asleep or in a sleep-like state.
97) Demonstrations of somnambulism and mesmerism as popular entertainment were part of the period's theater culture.
Modern hypnotic drugs may cause eating disorders, aggravate some parasomnias, induce somnambulism, and impair a person's ability to drive or operate machinery.
The major cause is the conducting of former bassoonist Evelino Pido, who himself seems to suffer from bouts of somnambulism.
As with Dracula, The Lair is easily reducible to an allegory about gender and sexual battling, but again, like Dracula, it also has to do with the irregular and unstable shapes of the human and the animal, of variable and inconsistent gestures of protection and maiming, of arbitrary and unpredictable forms of resistance and vulnerability, of irregular forms of somnambulism and wakefulness, of the vacillating and protean relation of reason and the irrational.