somnambulism

(redirected from somnambulant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to somnambulant: somnambulantly

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the talk about calculations in my somnambulant state, reminds me of a riddle which was popular during my school days.
As laid-back as a somnambulant librarian, the Irishman's passes were dangerous when not uncharacteristically wasteful.
In the dusty penumbral light, there's an eerie sensuality about them with their angular provocative poses, their hard glossy surfaces, their somnambulant masklike faces, features frozen in glacial eyeless gazes.
Burne-Jones was an antiquarian somnambulant astray amongst dreams which he preferred to remain dreams.
24) In this sense it meant moving away from the fragmentary and individualistic yet stultifyingly somnambulant materialist society of the coloniser, in favour of the 'purity' that Gandhi thought belonged to 'ancient civilisation.
Moreover, if the behavior of the narrator of the Book of the Duchess strikes us as overly contrived, the Parliament instead depicts a journey that can seem chaotic, formless, somnambulant, almost random, with the narrator drifting from one scene, one text, one sphere, to another.
The BSP's somnambulant campaign and the expected trouncing by Borissov led to vociferous public calls by senior BSP leaders for Stanishev to go, although he managed to hang on to the leadership - in a move that many at the time saw as a moment of survival quietly engineered by Purvanov so that the President, aware of the constitutional two-term limit for heads of state, could have his seat kept warm by Stanishev.
The logic of capitalism inscribes minds and bodies into "an environment, an atmosphere" that forgets everything beyond the surface of things (97); humans are nomads, somnambulant amnesiacs, oblivious to modes of production and, ultimately, unconscious of the transcendent origin of all material.
Seemingly moved by a sound coming from elsewhere, they are en-chanted as snakes, that is to say, "chanted within" and subdued by a hypnotic Voice which gives rhythm to their somnambulant gestures.
Caligari, the title character uses his hypnotic power over a somnambulant figure, Cesare, who carries out murders upon Caligari's suggestion.
8) Of course, we now enter wars the way autocracies and dictatorships do, with a cowardly press, a somnambulant citizenry, and a violated Constitution making that possible.