somnambulism

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Related to somnambulant: somnambulantly

sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

/som·nam·bu·lism/ (som-nam´bu-lizm) sleepwalking; rising out of bed and walking about or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep.

somnambulism

(sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.

somnambulism

[somnam′byəliz′əm]
Etymology: L, somnus, sleep, ambulare, to walk
1 also called noctambulation, sleepwalking, somnambulance. a condition occurring during stage 3 or 4 of nonrapid eye movement sleep that is characterized by complex motor activity, usually culminating in leaving the bed and walking about. The person has no recall of the episode on awakening. The episodes, which usually last from several minutes to half an hour or longer, are seen primarily in children, are more common in boys than in girls, and are more likely to occur if the individual is fatigued or under stress or has taken a sedative or hypnotic medication at bedtime. Seizure disorders, central nervous system infections, and trauma may be predisposing factors, but the condition is more commonly related to anxiety. In adults, the condition is less common and is classified as a dissociative reaction.
2 a hypnotic state in which the person has full possession of the senses but no recollection of the episode. See also fugue.

somnambulism

Sleepwalking, see there.

som·nam·bu·lism

(son-am'byū-lizm)
1. Sleepwalking; a disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occur primarily during the first third of the night but not during rapid eye movement sleep.
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism

See SLEEPWALKING.

Somnambulism

Another term for sleepwalking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

som·nam·bu·lism

, somnambulance (son-am'byū-lizm, -lăns)
Sleep disorder involving complex motor acts.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

somnambulism (somnam´būlizəm),

n a habitual walking in the sleep; a hypnotic state in which the subject has full possession of senses but no subsequent recollection.
References in periodicals archive ?
But many users have reported engaging in dangerous somnambulant activities after taking Ambien as directed.
I was roused from my somnambulant state by the arrival of the local press, come to capture on digital camera all the perfected emergency stops and movements from major to minor roads with hand signals.
The company needed a new sheriff, an out-of-towner who wasn't steeped in a corporate culture that was somnambulant even on its best day.
The art I made in the eighteen months after arriving in Alice Springs was surrealist, symbolic images about the tensions I had felt in coming to terms with the land's somnambulant boniness.
In "Robert Lowell: A Memorial Address," Heaney recalls the poet's habit of approaching people in a manner "half buoyant, half somnambulant, on the balls of his feet, his voice at once sharp and sidling" (23).
Note also that Evangelical Protestant congregations in Canada are calling for vigorous defensive action from their members, while the Knights of Columbus in Quebec have begun to stir up the otherwise religiously somnambulant Catholic community of that province.
managed to produce a bipartisan report on Iraq intelligence widely praised even among those who thought it could have gone further, Goss's committee has been practically somnambulant.
This work dispels the image of President Eisenhower as a genial, somnambulant golf-playing president.
Interestingly, these betrayals leave her both listless and somnambulant, like the weakened Laura of The Woman in White, and aggressive and murderous, like the mercenary Lady Audley.
Nothing has been accomplished, nothing has been resolved, as this somnambulant scene emphasizes.
The arrival earlier this year of Sandra Kennedy to head up the International Mass Retailing Association has ushered in brighter prospects for that once somnambulant organization.
Even if it hadn't, these "pouncing scorpions" must be somnambulant, neglecting even to take up our offer of assistance.