somesthetic


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somesthetic

(sō′mĕs-thĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Somatosensory.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

somesthetic

(sō-mĕs-thĕt′ĭk)
Pert. to sensations and sensory structures of the body.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with somesthetic perceptual symptoms were classified as type A (about 9% of all cases), and cases with visual illusions alone were classified as type B (these were not described by Todd himself but paradoxically are the most prevalent type, counting up to 75%), while patients with coexistent somesthetic and visual symptoms are considered as type C (about 16% of cases) [8].
Lanska, "Alice in wonderland syndrome: somesthetic vs visual perceptual disturbance," Neurology, vol.
Auditory hallucinations are by far the most common type, and hallucinations in any other sensory modality--visual, olfactory, kinesthetic, or somesthetic, for example--should be considered a warning sign.
The primary function of the parietal lobe is to provide an interpretation of sensory input.[12,14] The primary somesthetic area is located in the postcentral gyrus which exercises sensory control over the opposite side of the body.[14] The sensory cortex is arranged in the same type of topographical scheme as the motor strip with the feet being controlled by an area in the longitudinal fissure and facial muscles controlled by the temporal region.[12]
A recent study of nonepileptic patients with transection of different portions of the anterior CC performed to remove cysts [9] provided further confirmation demonstrating that the middle part of the genu is involved in motor coordination and the anterior portion of the body in the transfer of simple somesthetic information.
The somesthetic system (the senses related to the whole body) was stimulated by tactile images with a 32-Herz vibration frequency and a pulse amplitude of 21.56 volts.
Could portions of the right hemisphere responsible for maintaining the somesthetic body image "malfunction?" Studies in Sweden have supported the hypothesis of right hemispheric dysfunction evidenced by laterality of movements during sleep and waking.