somatopause

so·ma·to·pause

(sō'mă-tō-pawz'),
Decrease in growth hormone-insulinlike growth factor axis activities associated with aging.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

so·ma·to·pause

(sō'mă-tō-pawz)
Decrease in growth hormone-insulinlike growth factor axis activities associated with aging.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

somatopause

(sō-mă′tō-pawz) [Gr. soma, body, + pausis, cessation]
The age-related decline in the secretion of growth hormone, typically noticeable after age 60. Treatments may include formal exercise programs or, in some instances, growth hormone replacement.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The decreases in growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) in the circulation are associated with the aging process; a condition known as somatopause. This condition leads to a decrease in lean muscle mass, increase in body fat, increase in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a decrease in lipolysis (23,24) Aging also results in mitochondrial damage due to oxidative stress that results in the progressive decrease in age-related force (13).
These changes can be responsible for the decrease in activity of the GH / IGF-1 axis, also known as somatopause in adults.
Previous studies demonstrated that increasing serum T concentrations to the mid-normal range with low-dose T administration for 26 weeks increases nocturnal, spontaneous, pulsatile GH secretion, and morning IGF-I concentrations in healthy older men, supporting the hypothesis that age-related reductions in T may contribute to the concurrent "somatopause" [35].
Andropause and somatopause. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am.
However, during aging there is evidence of declining activity of the GH/IGF-I axis, which is mainly dependent on age-related variations in the hypothalamic control of somatotroph function (somatopause).
The decrease in the secretory activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis, commonly referred to as somatopause, correlates with a number of undesirable symptoms generally associated with aging.
Some of the most compelling evidence that somatopause may respond favorably to synthetic GH replacement therapy comes from investigations involving patients suffering from total or near total absence of GH secretion as a result of pituitary disease.
This paper will focus on the rationale of using Growth Hormone (GH) as an anti-ageing therapy in the healthy elderly with age-related decline in the activity of the GH/IGF-I axis, the so called "somatopause".
Other proposed "pauses" include the "psychopause," which involves age-related changes in mood, personality, and anxiety levels, and the "somatopause," which is related to declining levels of human growth hormone.
* somatopause, the loss of muscle strength and tone