somatology


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somatology

 [so″mah-tol´ah-je]
the sum of what is known about the body.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

so·ma·tol·o·gy

(sō'mă-tol'ŏ-jē),
The science concerned with the study of the body; includes both anatomy and physiology.
[somato- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

somatology

(sō′mə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The physiological and anatomical study of the body.
2. See physical anthropology.

so′ma·to·log′ic (sō′mə-tl-ŏj′ĭk, sō-măt′l-), so′ma·to·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ma·tol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

so·ma·tol·o·gy

(sō'mă-tol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the study of the body; includes both anatomy and physiology.
[somato- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Physical anthropology (somatology) was developed by Rudolf Virchow, a personality who also stimulated the unfolding of prehistoric archeology and who for Boas represented a model worthy to follow in science because he felicitously combined vast encyclopedic knowledge with the genius for understanding the causal relation between phenomena.
Conversely, Boas (1989: 273) observed that while physical anthropology (somatology) was interested in differences between human types, ethnology concentrated on similarities between cultural types from regions set apart from each other (Anthropology, 1908).