somatogenic


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somatogenic

 [so″mah-to-jen´ik]
originating in the cells of the body, as a disease process; the term contrasts with psychogenic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

so·mat·o·gen·ic

(sō'mat-ō-jen'ik),
1. Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

somatogenic

(sō-măt′ə-jĕn′ĭk, sō′mə-tə-) also

somatogenetic

(-jə-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Of somatic origin; developing from the somatic cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

so·ma·to·gen·ic

(sō'mă-tō-jen'ik)
1. Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

so·ma·to·gen·ic

(sō'mă-tō-jen'ik)
1. Originating in soma or body under influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In any case, by adding psychogenesis to somatogenesis, and psychogenic diseases (for example, perversions) to somatogenic diseases (for example, pneumonia), Freud expanded the conceptual categories of etiology and pathology.
Somatogenic activity is that which changes the cellular structure of the individual.
By Proton Emission Tomography (a PET scan), "somatogenic determinants of violent crime" can be identified in snapshots of living brain cells.
This dichotomization of pain into somatogenic and psychogenic types is not only incompatible with the gate control model outlined above, it is also clinically counterproductive.
(1991); they determined that the fragment of somatotropin between amino acid 120 and 140 had lactogenic and somatogenic action, and, although that region did not take part in binding of growth hormone with its receptors, the interaction between the four [alpha]-helixes could influence the structure of somatotropin (Chou and Zheng, 1992).
The ratio of somatogenic and psychogenic components in psychological dysfunction (when revealed).
Pain response is a perceptual phenomenon and refers to both physical (somatogenic) and psychological variables that include anxiety, expectations, attention, secondary gain, and various forms of psychopathology.[5] The specific application of hypnosis to pain control is well documented in the literature.[9-11] Erickson [12] reviewed 11 hypnotic procedures applicable to pain control.