somatogenic


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somatogenic

 [so″mah-to-jen´ik]
originating in the cells of the body, as a disease process; the term contrasts with psychogenic.

so·mat·o·gen·ic

(sō'mat-ō-jen'ik),
1. Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]

somatogenic

/so·ma·to·gen·ic/ (so″mah-to-jen´ik) originating in the cells of the body, as opposed to psychogenic.

somatogenic

(sō-măt′ə-jĕn′ĭk, sō′mə-tə-) also

somatogenetic

(-jə-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Of somatic origin; developing from the somatic cells.

so·ma·to·gen·ic

(sō'mă-tō-jen'ik)
1. Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]

somatogenic, (sō·ma·t·jeˑ·nik),

adj produced by actions, reactions, and changes within the musculoskeletal system.

so·ma·to·gen·ic

(sō'mă-tō-jen'ik)
1. Originating in soma or body under influence of external forces.
2. Having origin in body cells.
[somato- + G. genesis, origin]

somatogenic

originating in the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Conscious and unconscious psychomuscularly-based body movements and intervening or resulting still positions, either learned or somatogenic, of visual, visual-acoustic and tactile or kinesthetic perception, which, whether isolated or combined with the linguistic and paralinguistic structures and with other somatic and objectual behavioral systems, possess intended or unintended communicative value.
In any case, by adding psychogenesis to somatogenesis, and psychogenic diseases (for example, perversions) to somatogenic diseases (for example, pneumonia), Freud expanded the conceptual categories of etiology and pathology.
We already have a philosophical problem on our hands, having to do with free will and genetic fate (or somatogenic determinism).
This dichotomization of pain into somatogenic and psychogenic types is not only incompatible with the gate control model outlined above, it is also clinically counterproductive.
1991); they determined that the fragment of somatotropin between amino acid 120 and 140 had lactogenic and somatogenic action, and, although that region did not take part in binding of growth hormone with its receptors, the interaction between the four [alpha]-helixes could influence the structure of somatotropin (Chou and Zheng, 1992).