somatic

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somatic

 [so-mat´ik]
pertaining to or characteristic of the body (soma).

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik),
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general. Synonym(s): parietal (2)
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation. Synonym(s): parietal (3)
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

somatic

(sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affecting the body, especially as distinguished from a body part, the mind, or the environment; corporeal or physical.
2. Of or relating to the wall of the body cavity, especially as distinguished from the head, limbs, or viscera.
3. Of or relating to the portion of the vertebrate nervous system that regulates voluntary movement.
4. Of or relating to a somatic cell or the somatoplasm.

so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

somatic

adjective Pertaining to
1. The body.
2. Not the viscera.

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general.
Synonym(s): parietal (2) .
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation.
Synonym(s): parietal (3) .
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

somatic

1. Pertaining to the body (soma), as opposed to the mind (psyche).
2. Pertaining to general body cells that divide by MITOSIS, as distinct from ova and spermatozoa that are formed by MEIOSIS. All the body cells except those in the ovaries and testes that produce ova and spermatozoa.
3. Relating to the outer walls or framework of the body.

somatic

  1. of or relating to the SOMA.
  2. of or relating to the human body as distinct from the mind.

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to soma or trunk, wall of the body cavity, or body in general.
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal muscle and innervation of the latter.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]

Patient discussion about somatic

Q. Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? If not what else may be the factor? If it did not seem to be that you were actually losing your vision and that you needed glasses.

A. Depression may be part of a wider problem. Perhps stress headaches or migraine headaches or something like that is causing the vision problem. Tension will cause your muscles to lock up. Some of the tension headaches I have had made me think I was not seeing so good. It was like a pain all the way around and across the top of my nead. My doctor readily recognized that symptom and gave me a presscription for them, and it has worked well on them, something called Dolgic.

More discussions about somatic
References in periodicals archive ?
The encounter with the security guard registered a sense of injustice that was profoundly and somatically felt, an injustice based on the notion that we didn't feel that we'd done anything bad.
Individuals studied by these critics describe periods of total focus during an aesthetic encounter--felt vividly and somatically (Csikszentmihalyi 29)--in which a sense of time, place, and ego boundary seems to be transcended or heightened, "a condition so rewarding as to be sought for its own sake" (19).
Based on previous research (for a review, see Duda & Halt, 2001), it was hypothesized that an ego orientation, rather than task orientation, would be associated with a dispositional tendency to be either cognitively or somatically anxious in sport competition.
As such, it pertains to an inner psychic reality of the subject which is not just somatically projected, but held together internally by what some psychoanalysts call a "collated internal object" that can be experienced or actualized only through specific sexual acts.
Somatically, my boundary extends both inwards (my womb) and outwards (my breasts and belly) and my body image undergoes a radical change.
Although the santera's subject is constituted somatically by means of her social engravings, her body does not function as a site of external regulation and constraint, but rather as an intensified space of agency and activity.
We will see that the child's parts exhibit just such distinct characteristics from each other emotionally, somatically, and even in access to memory.
A good deal of this work departs from writings by seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza, who saw ideas and affects as two distinct modes of thought-with the idea as a mode of thought defined by its representational character and affect as a mode of thought "which doesn't represent anything." (3) Spinoza defines affect as the body's ability to affect and be affected, creating "modifications of the body whereby the active power of the said body is increased or diminished, aided or constrained." (4) When the body receives external or internal physical sensation, it responds somatically to these stimuli and they coalesce as affects, prior to registering in the conscious mind of an individual.
The urinary sphincter, composed of an internal component, a continuation of detrusor smooth muscle that converges to form a thickened bladder neck controlled by the autonomic nervous system, and a somatically controlled external component (striated muscle), must relax to allow for the contracting bladder to expel its load.
A possible explanation for the faster growth observed in the M class would be that these seeds would not be sexually mature presenting preferential somatically growth, while those in the L class allocate energy for reproduction (gametogenic growth) reducing the somatic growth rhythm and making the growth in this latter class less evident.
When dealing with families that have been somatically fixated, it's important to initially focus on the symptoms, while not getting dragged into the way that the symptoms have become a centrally organizing event for the family.
John Shelly Kahn works as a lawyer that wants to be successful somatically and economically without losing his belief to legality collection so that he agrees to undertake the attorney of two powerful companies.