somatic

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somatic

 [so-mat´ik]
pertaining to or characteristic of the body (soma).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik),
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general. Synonym(s): parietal (2)
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation. Synonym(s): parietal (3)
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

somatic

(sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affecting the body, especially as distinguished from a body part, the mind, or the environment; corporeal or physical.
2. Of or relating to the wall of the body cavity, especially as distinguished from the head, limbs, or viscera.
3. Of or relating to the portion of the vertebrate nervous system that regulates voluntary movement.
4. Of or relating to a somatic cell or the somatoplasm.

so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

somatic

adjective Pertaining to
1. The body.
2. Not the viscera.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to the soma or trunk, the wall of the body cavity, or the body in general.
Synonym(s): parietal (2) .
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal (voluntary) muscle and the innervation of the latter, as distinct from the viscera or visceral (involuntary) muscle and its (autonomic) innervation.
Synonym(s): parietal (3) .
3. Relating to the vegetative, as distinguished from the generative, functions.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

somatic

1. Pertaining to the body (soma), as opposed to the mind (psyche).
2. Pertaining to general body cells that divide by MITOSIS, as distinct from ova and spermatozoa that are formed by MEIOSIS. All the body cells except those in the ovaries and testes that produce ova and spermatozoa.
3. Relating to the outer walls or framework of the body.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

somatic

  1. of or relating to the SOMA.
  2. of or relating to the human body as distinct from the mind.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

so·mat·ic

(sō-mat'ik)
1. Relating to soma or trunk, wall of the body cavity, or body in general.
2. Relating to or involving the skeleton or skeletal muscle and innervation of the latter.
[G. sōmatikos, bodily]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about somatic

Q. Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? Can depression cause your sight to narrow and your vision to be very spacey? If not what else may be the factor? If it did not seem to be that you were actually losing your vision and that you needed glasses.

A. Depression may be part of a wider problem. Perhps stress headaches or migraine headaches or something like that is causing the vision problem. Tension will cause your muscles to lock up. Some of the tension headaches I have had made me think I was not seeing so good. It was like a pain all the way around and across the top of my nead. My doctor readily recognized that symptom and gave me a presscription for them, and it has worked well on them, something called Dolgic.

More discussions about somatic
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