somesthetic

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somesthetic

(sō′mĕs-thĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Somatosensory.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

somesthetic

(sō-mĕs-thĕt′ĭk)
Pert. to sensations and sensory structures of the body.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many more questions here, but post-critical inquiry will quest for a degree of coherence in the triads of (1) ontology, epistemology and methodology whose (2) socio-ecological intersections with a somaesthetics, ethics and politics of environmental designs should not separate off each element of the respective but interrelated triads.
When I actually attempt to thematize these matters in full evidential awareness, taking the somaesthetic saliences I am currently undergoing as an example, it becomes clear that what must be suspended in order to perform the radical reduction to the living present is the tendency to take the events that I am feeling as adumbrations-"of" the privileged (and enduring) experiential "object" that might be termed "my own lived body sensuously felt from within" (29).
Irwin's rationale for studying somatoform dissociation in OBEs is that 'at a phenomenological level the OBE appears to entail a dissociation between sensory processing of somatic (somaesthetic and kinaesthetic) events and the sense of self or identity' (Irwin, 2000, p.
As indicated earlier, the argument for the potential relevance of dissociative processes to the OBE is that at a phenomenological level the OBE appears to entail a dissociation between sensory processing of somatic (somaesthetic and kinesthetic) events and the sense of self or identity.
What I want to develop is a more concrete way educationists might think about somaesthetics in the context of eating animals.
The cryptic notes and aphorisms of Wittgenstein that frequently imply insignificance of sensations also recognize the role of somaesthetic feelings, when he speaks of "aesthetic feeling for one's body" in the fields of philosophy of mind, politics, ethics and aesthetics.
(18) See, for example, Richard Shusterman, Pragmatist Aesthetics: Living Beauty, Rethinking Art (Lanham, 2000; 2nd Edition) or, idem, Thinking through the Body: Essays in Somaesthetics (Cambridge & New York, 2012); John J.
In the second part of his essay, Rowe examines the educative potential of what he calls "gastro-aesthetic pedagogy," which is an "embodied pedagogy of food that reduces the cognitive dissonance between the living body of the eater and the dead body of the eaten." Philosophically, gastro-aesthetic pedagogy draws largely on the work of Richard Shusterman, in particular the form of analysis, somaesthetics, which Shusterman defines as the "study of the experience and use of one's body as a locus of sensory-aesthetic appreciation (aisthesis) and creative self-fashioning" (1999, p.
Somaesthetics and The Second Sex: A pragmatist reading of a feminist classic.
Shusterman's pragmatism; between literature and somaesthetics.