soluble antigen


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sol·u·ble an·ti·gen

viral antigen that remains in solution after the particles of virus have been removed by means of centrifugation; in the case of the influenza viruses, it is the internal helical structure, free of the external envelope.
Synonym(s): S antigen (1)

soluble antigen

An antigen dissolved in a liquid. A soluble antigen is recognized by B lymphocytes but cannot be detected by T lymphocytes until it has been processed by an antigen-presenting cell. See: T cell.
See also: antigen
References in periodicals archive ?
In a previous paper we have evaluated the regulation and proliferation induced by soluble antigens of epimastigotes or trypomastigotes (24).
The use of soluble antigen (SA) in serum of patients with Chagas' disease showed higher cross-reactivity (6/10).
However, we also demonstrate that although the complex is internalized and presented, there is no improvement in antigen presentation when compared to soluble antigen and thus it does not enhance indirect allopresentation.
Systemic administration of soluble antigens is a well-accepted approach to induce immunological tolerance [12].
The soluble antigens, mainly represented by toxins, are deeply involved in the pathogenesis of blackleg.
This procedure was repeated three times to completely wash all soluble antigens from the remaining parasite membranous fraction.
There is a 100-fold enhanced presentation of soluble antigens to T cells after being internalized by the MR on DCs, as compared to antigens internalized via fluid phase [9].
They also showed for the first time that CD141hi DCs were superior at cross-presenting soluble antigens compared to other DCs to activate the killer T cells.
Some suppression of cell-mediated immunity occurs, and maternal lymphocytes demonstrate a diminished proliferative response to soluble antigens and to allergenic lymphocytes.
The infusion sedimentation theory describes the infusion of water soluble antigens from saliva into the tooth such as dentine.
Unlike a type II response, type III hypersensitivity is associated with responses to soluble antigens that are not combined with host tissues but with antibodies in the blood, which can then lead to inflammatory responses.