stercoral ulcer

(redirected from solitary rectal ulcer)

ster·co·ral ul·cer

an ulcer of the colon due to pressure and irritation of retained fecal masses.

stercoral ulcer

A colonic ulcer that develops in elderly or mentally retarded Pts with intractable constipation due to pressure of impacted fecal material and sluggish mesenteric circulation; with time, infected fistulas form under the ulcer. See Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

ster·co·ral ul·cer

(stĕr'kōr-ăl ŭl'sĕr)
A lesion of the colon due to pressure and irritation of retained fecal masses.

stercoral ulcer

A rarely occurring ulcer of the colon caused by pressure from impacted feces. Perforation through the walls of the colon may cause peritonitis, sepsis, and sometimes death.
See also: ulcer
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results with lower gastrointestinal endoscopy Endoscopic diagnosis Number Percentage (%) Normal 354 40.6 Colorectal cancer 29 3.3 Colorectal polyp 150 17.2 Hemorrhoidal disease 191 21.9 Diverticular disease 67 7.7 Colitis Nonspecific colitis 68 7.8 Ulcerative colitis 33 3.7 Crohn disease 9 1 Ischemic colitis 1 0.1 Anal polyp 11 1.2 Anal fissure 46 5.2 Perianal fistula 10 1.1 Solitary rectal ulcer 5 0.5 Anastomotic ulcer 1 0.1 Rectal prolapse 1 0.1 Angiodysplasia 1 0.1 Parasites 1 0.1 Table 3.
Her anamnesis showed a long history of depression, under treatment, and a solitary rectal ulcer.
Rectal ulcer, unrelated to malignancy, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), or infectious colitis includes two distinct disease entities: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) [1,2] and acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer syndrome (AHRUS) [3].
Eloubeidi, "Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: endoscopic spectrum and review of the literature," Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol.
Common organic causes include cryptitis, anal fissure, perianal abscess (with or without fistula), hemorrhoids, solitary rectal ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, and rectal ischemia (Figure 3).
Patients with full thickness rectal prolapse, Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome with internal prolapse and rectocele were included in the study.
Signs of CCP include rectal bleeding, mucorrhea, diarrhea, and colonic obstruction, similar to other associated disorders.[sup][3] CCP is associated with a variety of ulcerating diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis [UC] and Crohn's disease), infectious colitis, rectal prolapse, solitary rectal ulcer, and diverticulitis, among others.[sup][4],[5],[6] CCP can resemble adenoma, adenocarcinoma, lipoma, endometriosis, neurofibroma, pseudopolyps, and pneumatosis coli.[sup][7] However, the etiology of CCP is not yet well-defined.
of % cases Chroniccolitis 37 45.12 Ulcerativecolitis 18 21.95 Acute colitis 8 9.76 Tuberculosis 6 7.32 Inflammatory polyp 3 3.66 Solitary rectal ulcer 3 3.66 Crohn's colitis 2 2.44 Hyperplastic polyp 2 2.44 Amoebic colitis 1 1.22 Lymphoid polyp 1 1.22 Malabsorption syndrome 1 1.22 Total 82 100.00 Table 3: Distribution of Neoplastic Lesions Lesions No Total % Benign 8 32.00 No Dysplasia Serrated 1 12.50 adenoma With Dysplasia 7 87.50 Serrated 1 adenoma Villous 2 adenoma Tubulovillous 2 adenoma Tubular 2 Adenoma Malignant 17 68.00 Adenocarcinoma 16 94.12 Well 6 differentiated Mod 7 differentiated Poorly 2 differentiated Mucin 1 Melanoma secreting 1 5.88 Total 25 100.00
Rectal ulcer has the following differential diagnoses: Radiation rectal ulceration, solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, ischemic proctitis, stercoral ulcer, and rectal ulcers secondary to treatment with nonsteroidal compounds.
It is present in 40% of patients with solitary rectal ulcer (SRU) and in 33% of patients with unexplained perineal pain without a history of obstructed defecation.
In case of bleeding, some stitches are applied at the suture line and the removed tissue is sent to the histology laboratory for ruling out a possible solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.