solipsism

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sol·ip·sism

(sōl'ip-sizm),
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]

solipsism

(sōl′ĭp-sĭzm) [L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
The theory that the self may know only its feelings and changes and there is then only subjective reality.

sol·ip·sism

(sol'ip-sizm)
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to the incommutability of our bodily sensations, we are, Hume says, epistemologically solipsist and morally selfish.
Rather, since you in your solipsist world cannot perceive my intention even if I do have one, we'd better forget the business of communication through "intention" or "consciousness," and start to trade service as the "sign" with each other.
Pic recalls the freakish obsessives and solipsists in the Austrian helmer's earlier docus on pet owners and models more than his internationally distributed feature debut, "Dog Days," though it shares the last pic's gimlet-eyed view of human oddity.
The pragmatic standard is not a warrant but a corrective for subjectivism or relativism, a therapy for solipsists and skeptics.
Doctors above all others should be immune to it, for two reasons: first, by the nature of their occupation, for they cannot be solipsists.
Oz's fiction too is dominated by such characters, from the woman narrator of My Michael, who is going mad, to the visionaries, crusaders, dreamers and solipsists in Unto Death and The Hill of Evil Counsel.
Yonatan (Yoni) Lifshitz of A Perfect Peace is one of Oz's brooding solipsists.
7) Rather, the ethical solipsist in my Kantian like sense insists that my will is the only ethically relevant one; the moral world, the normative sphere in which ethical orientation is required, is "my world", and I can only assess my own moral thought and conduct, never really that of any others.