solipsism

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sol·ip·sism

(sōl'ip-sizm),
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

solipsism

(sōl′ĭp-sĭzm) [L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
The theory that the self may know only its feelings and changes and there is then only subjective reality.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sol·ip·sism

(sol'ip-sizm)
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Strangely enough, in "Corresponding With Reality" (in his 2012), the very article in which Putnam charges internal realism of being solipsist, he himself, towards the end, reminds us the importance of Wittgensteinian "imponderable evidence" (as he did in his Pragmatism: An Open Question) when it comes to justification.
This is actually not very far from Michael Dummett's account of justification through language learning: "when we acquire the practice of using language, what we learn is what is taken to justify assertions of different types." (Dummett 2004: 114) Internal realism, far from being the solipsist doctrine which Putnam now claims it to be, gives us a clue to our justificatory practices by pointing out to one of our more accepted rules of justification, namely, the condition that a statement is justified if the epistemological conditions for stating it are good enough.
Thanks to the incommutability of our bodily sensations, we are, Hume says, epistemologically solipsist and morally selfish.
Rather, since you in your solipsist world cannot perceive my intention even if I do have one, we'd better forget the business of communication through "intention" or "consciousness," and start to trade service as the "sign" with each other.
Using a phrase coined by Rich, I went through graduate school a "white solipsist"--engaged in "passive collusion" in racism by "think[ing], imagin[ing], and speak[ing] as if whiteness described the world" (Ibid.: 299).
The pragmatic standard is not a warrant but a corrective for subjectivism or relativism, a therapy for solipsists and skeptics.
Doctors above all others should be immune to it, for two reasons: first, by the nature of their occupation, for they cannot be solipsists. Second, they understand the inherent limitations of human life, and therefore retain a sense of irony.
Oz's fiction too is dominated by such characters, from the woman narrator of My Michael, who is going mad, to the visionaries, crusaders, dreamers and solipsists in Unto Death and The Hill of Evil Counsel.
Yonatan (Yoni) Lifshitz of A Perfect Peace is one of Oz's brooding solipsists. As 26, he has had his fill of kibbutz life, of marriage, of responsibility, of his father's wisdom and his mother's bitterness, of the routines of being a Jewish son and husband.
(7) Rather, the ethical solipsist in my Kantian like sense insists that my will is the only ethically relevant one; the moral world, the normative sphere in which ethical orientation is required, is "my world", and I can only assess my own moral thought and conduct, never really that of any others.
The ethical solipsist, then, need not be a solipsist in an ontological or an epistemological sense, but a form of transcendental solipsism, a view pertaining to the basic meaning or significance of the world for us, is a natural background of the kind of ethical solipsism I am here trying to understand.
Wittgenstein, in the Tractatus, seems to have been not only a transcendental solipsist about the objects of linguistic description (i.e., the world given to the subject, which is its "limit"), but also an ethical solipsist roughly in the sense indicated above.