solipsism

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sol·ip·sism

(sōl'ip-sizm),
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

solipsism

(sōl′ĭp-sĭzm) [L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
The theory that the self may know only its feelings and changes and there is then only subjective reality.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sol·ip·sism

(sol'ip-sizm)
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He is never coy about this or solipsistic; he seems to have a sense of exactly the right distance and right degree of information needed.
Similarly, Ernst Wiechert's novels, which have been seen as classic works of Innere Emigration, are ambiguous because they create a reduced solipsistic space, which does not represent only self-protecting conservatism (Walter Delabar).
Many new Southern homes substitute a solipsistic deck out back for the traditional front porch.
6) draws upon the thought of Levinas and Merleau-Ponty to suggest that beneath the achievement of sociality there lies the unsettling recollection of solipsistic experience.
There is no disputing, moreover, a solipsistic side to the American individualist tradition.
He's not interested in solipsistic self-enrichment; rather, he practices the art of transformation.
Cyrano is the hidden creator of solipsistic Christian's letters and of the monologue to Roxanne, whom Cyrano loves but fears will reject him because of his grotesque nose.
But in the tradition of Dostoevsky's underground man and other buried or solipsistic writers to imaginary audiences, she realizes, with Humbert Humbert, that "I shall not exist if you do not imagine me."
In chapter 11, while trying to show how Hegel's absolute knowledge preserves otherness within it, Williams contrasts two models of absolute knowledge - the "idealist" (solipsistic, a-historical) model and the "intersubjective" (social, historical) model - and argues for the latter.
If the Mondale-Dukakis mind was wired permanently through the institutions of government, then the Reagan mind ran a solipsistic loop back to self.
Even a few of the more predictable aspects of his artmaking--that the largest canvases have the largest brushstrokes, for example, and that Whitney somewhat slavishly respects the canvases' edges, reinforcing their vertical or horizontal articulation, as if he is painting on pre-stretched canvas--seem part of his endeavor to practice gestural abstraction while turning away from the solipsistic drama that, throughout its history, has defined it.
What could have been solipsistic is a lovely and genuine account of generational understanding, and a wonderful display of the inherent advantages of the tiny 24p vid camera.