solipsism


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sol·ip·sism

(sōl'ip-sizm),
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

solipsism

(sōl′ĭp-sĭzm) [L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
The theory that the self may know only its feelings and changes and there is then only subjective reality.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sol·ip·sism

(sol'ip-sizm)
A philosophic concept that whatever exists is a product of will and the ideas of the person making the perception.
[L. solus, alone, + ipse, self]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While the two instances just cited concern fantasy, romantic solipsism is not restricted to the domain of imagination.
Nevertheless, Putnam has recently accepted that talk of mental qualia makes good sense, and thus, his rejection of internal realism now centers on charges of solipsism and lack of public intelligibility.
This stuff at the heart of the matter is essentially, intellectually primitive and cumbersome, no matter how much power, psychologism, techno-scientism, and modernity it displays: a set of mere opinions made strong by way of any kind of political favoritism does not solve the age-long problem of syllogistic solipsism and solipsistic syllogism in science and philosophy.
His work does tend toward solipsism. In this respect, undoubtedly these critics are right.
Therefore, a kind of ethical solipsism seems to follow from relatively basic Kantian premises.
Solipsism is a philosophical dilemma that is encountered when the idea of separate minds is endorsed (Gergen, 1989; Hansen, 2004; Ryan, 1999).
Yet it is not an example of the solipsism which is incurably inappropriate in the current global social climate.
A limitation of this approach is illustrated by the impossibility of disproving solipsism, which we all reject.
Perhaps the most difficult challenge in terms of integrating the various parts of the Tractatus involves Wittgenstein's remarks on solipsism in the 5.6s.
I've never understood the charge of solipsism registered against the lyric.
Harold Bloom states, rather disdainfully, that the "fear of solipsism is greater in him than the fear of not individuating his own imagination" and that this fear is the source of Coleridge's eventual poetic failure.
Pragmatism is first and foremost not philosophical opportunism or unflinching solipsism, but a religious or spiritual proposition that human beings are suited for belief, that believing leads to a better life, and that if you can't believe in God or Allah in an orthodox fashion, you can still believe in believing.