solid

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solid

 [sol´id]
1. not fluid or gaseous; not hollow.
2. a substance or tissue not fluid or gaseous.

sol·id

(sol'id),
1. Firm; compact; not fluid; without interstices or cavities; not cancellous.
2. A body that retains its form when not confined; one that is not fluid, neither liquid nor gaseous.
[L. solidus]

solid

[sol′id]
Etymology: L, solidus
1 n, a dense body, figure, structure, or substance that has length, breadth, and thickness, is not a liquid or a gas, contains no significant cavity or hollowness, and has no breaks or openings on its surface.
2 adj, describing such a body, figure, structure, or substance.

solid

Physics
adjective Referring to a substance that is not liquid or gas.
 
noun A substance, material or object that is not a liquid or gas.

sol·id

(sol'id)
1. Firm; compact; not fluid; without interstices or cavities; not cancellous.
2. A body that retains its form when not confined; one that is not fluid, neither liquid nor gaseous.
[L. solidus]

solid

1. not fluid or gaseous; not hollow.
2. a substance or tissue not fluid or gaseous.

solid color
said of animal haircoats; the same color all over the animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Beaumont knew the market as Wordsworth did not, and Poems in Two Volumes received the worst reviews of Wordsworth's career--which is saying a lot, even though critical posterity has often opined that these two volumes are perhaps the solidest single production of his active career.
Genre, as Davenport says, is an "approximation" and so the genres that are self-described in prologues or parodied (as romance can be defined by Sir Thopas) are taken as the most convincing guide and Chaucer's self-declarations in the Canterbury Tales of the various genres are taken as the solidest account of genre types; therefore, a survey of the Canterbury Tales is a survey of medieval narrative genre.
The End of the Affair, recipient of the Catholic Literary Award in the USA, was banned in late 1951, prompting a Department of Justice official to question the severity of the censorship and argue that it would be 'better that a number of doubtful books should be allowed to circulate, in order to ensure that no book will be banned except on the solidest grounds'.