solicitation

(redirected from soliciting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

solicitation

a personal approach by a veterinarian to a person who is not a client and soliciting for any veterinary work that the person may have is unprofessional, unethical and, in most countries, illegal under the law governing veterinary practice.
References in periodicals archive ?
6, the AG's Office filed a lawsuit in Suffolk Superior Court against the charity, and alleged Focus on Veterans violated the state charitable solicitation laws by soliciting donations outside Massachusetts businesses without a valid Certificate for Solicitation from the AG's Office.
Two other motorists in other cases gave similar allegations regarding the defendant soliciting and collecting bribes.
Soliciting corporations are subject to different rules for certain key matters.
Rahman, Javed and Muhid were jailed for six years for soliciting murder and three years concurrently for stirring up race hate.
Her lover, Anton Lee, was jailed for four years for soliciting murder.
GAO said the buying agency can satisfy competition requirements by soliciting quotations from at least three contractors and is not required to solicit the incumbent.
County health experts say that while the soliciting of day laborers is alarming, they are more concerned about the transmission of HIV and the use of crystal meth among gay and bisexual men across all communities.
Over the years, we have found that we get more responses this way, as opposed to directly soliciting for this type of information.
low revenue soliciting corporations would not be required to provide a full audit but a "review engagement";
The city is soliciting ideas as part of its comprehensive strategy to create a plan for the area that will leverage the district's excellent location and improve local connections between Downtown Flushing, Corona, Shea Stadium and Flushing Meadows Corona Park.
He pleaded guilty to soliciting a woman on Zetland Road in Middlesbrough on November 30 last year.
The court held that a prison directive that prohibited prisoners from soliciting did not violate the prisoner's First Amendment rights because there was a rational connection between the directive and a legitimate governmental interest in prison security, and where there were no alternative avenues that would allow the prisoner to exercise his rights.