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flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflowed solder paste SIR was also higher on the low-Tg materials than the high-Tg materials but to a much lesser extent than comb-down wave soldering fluxes. Many wave-soldering fluxes with rosin content, even as little as 1%, pass SIR testing per IPC-TM-650 when soldered comb-down on the high-Tg FR-4 laminates.
(1.) Chrys Shea, Sanju Arora and Steve Brown, "Selection of Wave Soldering Fluxes for Pb-Free Assembly," CIRCUITS ASSEMBLY, March 2007.
The authors would like to acknowledge the flux suppliers for proving their wave soldering fluxes for this evaluation.
Here's one of the exceptions I mentioned: Non-ionic halogenated compounds can also be used as raw materials in soldering fluxes to help keep activators working as process temperatures increase, but they are used in far smaller quantities than in boards or components, and their inclusion is not an absolute necessity.
Based on the solids content, wave soldering fluxes fall into three major categories:
No-clean fluxes are designed to be protective and insulative of boards, but in selective soldering fluxes often fail to become fully complexed, leaving harmful conductive residues on the board.
Cookson EAM develops, manufactures and sells materials used in electronic assembly processes, including: solder paste, stencils, squeegee blades, stencil and printed circuit board cleaners, bar solder, cored wire solder, wave soldering fluxes and surface-mount device adhesives.