soft palate

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soft pal·ate

[TA]
the posterior muscular portion of the palate, forming an incomplete septum between the mouth and the oropharynx and between the oropharynx and the nasopharynx.

soft palate

n.
The movable fold, consisting of muscular fibers enclosed in a mucous membrane, that is suspended from the rear of the hard palate and closes off the nasal cavity from the oral cavity during swallowing or sucking.

soft palate

the structure composed of mucous membrane, muscular fibers, and mucous glands, suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate forming the roof of the mouth. When the soft palate rises, as in swallowing and in sucking, it separates the nasal cavity and the nasopharynx from the posterior part of the oral cavity and the oral part of the pharynx. The posterior border of the soft palate hangs like a curtain between the mouth and the pharynx. Suspended from it is the conical, pendulous, palatine uvula. Arching laterally from the base of the uvula are the two curved musculomembranous pillars of the fauces. In dentistry, the soft palate serves as the anatomical landmark for construction of a maxillary full denture and establishment of a seal which helps retain the denture in the mouth. See posterior palatal seal. Compare hard palate.

soft pal·ate

(sawft pal'ăt) [TA]
The posterior muscular portion of the palate, forming an incomplete septum between the mouth and the oropharynx, and between the oropharynx and the nasopharynx.
Synonym(s): velum palatinum.

soft palate

The mobile flap of muscle covered with mucous membrane that is attached to the rear edge of the hard palate. The soft palate seals off the cavity of the nose from the mouth during swallowing.

Soft palate

The structure at the roof of the mouth that separates the mouth and the pharynx.
Mentioned in: Snoring

soft pal·ate

(sawft pal'ăt) [TA]
Posterior muscular portion of palate, forming an incomplete septum between mouth and oropharynx and between oropharynx and nasopharynx.
Synonym(s): velum palatinum.

soft palate

the fleshy partition at the back of the mouth which separates the nasopharynx from the oropharynx and which, together with the hard palate, forms the roof of the mouth.

cleft soft palate
commonly the posterior part is defective but may be part of a defect involving both soft and hard palates. Manifested by difficulties in sucking or nasal regurgitation of milk and food from a young age. Often associated with entrapment of the palate by the aryepiglottic fold. See also cleft lip.
soft palate dislocation
see dorsal soft palate displacement (below).
dorsal soft palate displacement
the free edge of the soft palate is displaced from its normal position under the epiglottis to lie over the opening of the larynx causing reduction in airflow. Common only in horses.
elongated soft palate, overlong soft palate
a common abnormality in brachycephalic dogs in which it causes inspiratory respiratory distress, gagging and coughing. The soft palate interferes with the epiglottis and glottis, particularly after it becomes inflamed and edematous. Other anomalies of the respiratory tract commonly are also present. Affected horses appear to choke, then continue to breathe through their mouth with a characteristic rattling sound. The cause and pathogenesis are unclear.
soft palate myositis
may contribute to soft palate paresis.
soft palate paresis
causes a functional pharyngeal paresis and the affected horse chokes up during exercise; often accompanies laryngeal hemiplegia.
References in periodicals archive ?
We either cauterise the soft palate or laser it to give it some tone.
Statistics suggest that operations on a soft palate have a success rate of 60 to 65 per cent, but in my experience it is more like 80 per cent.
The indications for superior adenoidectomy were a short soft palate (n=14), bifid uvula (n=4), and questionable palatal mobility (n=4).
She had a short soft palate, but no bifid uvula or submucosal cleft palate.
Gibb reviewed data on 27,734 children who had undergone tonsil and adenoid removal and found that only 19 had experienced subsequent hypernasality; 18 of them had some degree of a short soft palate, and five also had a bifid uvula.
He emphasized the importance of evaluating the point where the soft palate buckles during phonation in relation to the pharynx.