soft monies

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soft monies

A term of art for health funds in the UK which are usually “one-off” payments that came from private practice, cremation fees or donations from volunteer groups, but aren’t recurrent or reliable revenue streams that would fund a post or pay for any ongoing need for major supplies or an extra staff member in a department or service.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Soft Money. This term generally is used to refer to money that may indirectly influence federal elections but is raised and spent outside the purview of federal laws and would be illegal if spent directly on a federal election.
the hard money limits, the political parties created a soft money
Many Democrats, once champions of campaign finance reform, have put winning the White House ahead of "good government." Republicans, like those at a Senate hearing on the topic scheduled for March 10, are suddenly aghast that there's soft money being used to finance campaign activities.
Our legislation aims to end the current system in which corporate treasury and union dues money drowns out the voice of individual Americans by banning soft money and closing the sham "issue ad" loophole.
Thus, the Court deemed constitutional the specific provisions of the act that limit soft money: prohibiting the national political parties from raising or spending these funds; barring state political parties from spending soft money on federal election activity; banning federal officeholders or candidates from raising or spending it; and blocking state candidates from using soft money for public communications that promote or attack federal candidates.
The district court ruled that parties could raise soft money, but only to fund party-building activities, such as voter registration and GOTV operations.
The ban on soft money will have an anticompetitive impact on future electoral outcomes.
Most egregiously, the FEC adopted a regulation that allows the Democratic and Republican parties to create new shell organizations that can continue to collect the unlimited soft money that the bill sets out to ban.
Feingold: I think it's because the Democratic Party decided that corporatizing was a way to help with fundraising, especially in an era of soft money. It allowed the Democratic Party, in their view, to blunt some of the issues, like trade, that were causing problems with, frankly, the larger moneyed interests.
The new law--dubbed Shays-Meehan--has two major provisions: a ban on "soft money" and restrictions on broadcast advertising.
on Valentine's Day, was deeply divided, with 198 Democrats and 41 Republicans voting for the ban on "soft money" -- unlimited donations to political parties -- while 176 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it.
The Bill would allow state and local parties to raise soft money, but only in amounts of pounds 6,250 or less.