sodomist

(redirected from sodomite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to sodomite: Gomorrah, Sodom and Gomorrah, sodomising

sod·om·ist

, sodomite (sod'ŏ-mist, -mīt),
One who practices sodomy.
[G. sodomitēs, an inhabitant of the city of Sodom, said in the Bible to have been destroyed by fire because of the wickedness of its people]

sodomist

[sod′əmist]
Etymology: Sodom, biblical city in ancient Palestine
a person who practices sodomy. Also called sodomite [sod′əmīt] .

sod·om·ist

, sodomite (sod'ŏ-mist, -mīt)
One who practices sodomy.
[G. sodomitēs, an inhabitant of the city of Sodom, described in the Bible to have been destroyed by fire because of the wickedness of its people]
References in periodicals archive ?
L'effectivite des interdits sexuels permet, a partir du Moyen Age, aux autorites civiles et ecclesiastiques d'augmenter progressivement leur controle sur les sodomites, souvent associes aux heretiques.
It is obviously difficult to believe that the poet actually saw the Sodomite relationships and the faithful Christian's individual bond with Christ as anything but wildly dissimilar, yet for some reason he hints at the fact that on a certain level of logic they both share the same characteristics, which in the former case invite censure of the highest proportions, whereas in the latter they are actually seen as desirable.
A long chapter on "Politics and 'Sodomy'" investigates various renderings of the notorious sodomy of Edward II and Piers Gaveston (though not the Marlowe play), James I and the duke of Buckingham (including a remarkable 1655 play by Francis Osborne entitled The True Tragicomedy), and, more unusually, the later seventeenth-century sodomites du jour Titus Oates and William Ill.
could and did denote a 'confused category' of acts, in many other sources we find increasing evidence of a more narrow and specific usage, a usage in which these words refer first and foremost to sexual contact between two males; likewise, sodomite comes to refer specifically to a man who engages in a sexual act with another man.
Most prominently, rather than focus exclusively on early modern representations of same-sex eroticism, Sexual Types includes figures of indeterminate (or "bi-") sexuality (the narcissistic courtier, the monstrous favorite) and figures that fit modern definitions of "heterosexuality" (the citizen wife, the bawd) as well as those that appear to conform to the modern definition of "homosexuality" (the sodomite, the tribade).
From around 1730 accusations of heterosexual whoremongery were no longer considered defamatory, but "the fear of being exposed as a sodomite left men paralyzed" (p.
It is an argument that seems in some ways to confuse the early modern sodomite with the modern homosexual, in particular because Corum seems to suggest that the thing Henry wants always to suppress most is sexual desire for other men (though he equivocates on this point because, as he knows, sodomy in the early modern period is never simply a sexual crime).
These show the gradual, to many people almost imperceptible, path toward the equality of the sodomite lifestyle and same-sex "marriage with the lifestyle of a traditional family of one man and one woman.
The Rev Ian Brown, of the Free Presbyterian Church, condemned the new legislation, saying: "We want to defend our children against sodomite propaganda.
The play premiered in 1895, the same year Wilde brought a slander suit against the Marquess of Queensberry, who had left a note at Wilde's club accusing him of ``posing as a sodomite.
Barnes posits that masculinity can only be defined as a third point of a triangle that has Woman and Sodomite as the other two points.
But despite this condemnation, sodomy was never considered the practice of a specific subgroup or sexual minority; anyone could be a sodomite.