sodium nitrite


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sodium

 [so´de-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 11, atomic weight 22.990, symbol Na. (See Appendix 6.) Sodium is the major cation of the extracellular fluid, constituting 90 to 95 per cent of all cations in the blood plasma and interstitial fluid; it thus determines the osmolality of the extracellular fluid. The serum sodium concentration is normally about 140 mEq/L. If the sodium level and osmolality fall, osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus are stimulated and cause the release of antidiuretic hormone from the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. This hormone increases the absorption of water in the collecting ducts of the kidneys so that water is conserved while sodium and other electrolytes are excreted in the urine. If the sodium level and osmolality rise, neurons in the thirst center of the hypothalamus are stimulated. The thirsty person then drinks enough water to restore the osmolality of the extracellular fluid to the normal level.



A decrease in the serum sodium concentration (hyponatremia) can occur in a variety of conditions. It is often associated with deficient fluid volume due to diarrhea or vomiting when water is replaced faster than sodium. It can also occur in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, in the late stages of congestive heart failure or cirrhosis of the liver, in acute or chronic renal failure, and in diuretic therapy. An increase in the serum sodium concentration (hypernatremia) occurs when insensible water loss is not replaced by drinking, as in a comatose patient with diabetes insipidus.
sodium acetate a source of sodium ions for hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, as well as a systemic and urinary alkalizer.
sodium ascorbate an antiscorbutic vitamin and nutritional supplement for parenteral administration. It is also used as an aid to deferoxamine therapy in the treatment of chronic iron toxicity.
sodium benzoate an antifungal agent also used in a test of liver function.
sodium bicarbonate NaHCO3, a white powder commonly found in households. It has a wide variety of uses in chemistry, in pharmaceuticals, and in consumer products. It is sometimes taken in water as a remedy for acid indigestion but should not be used regularly since when taken in excess it tends to cause alkalosis. It can be mixed with water and applied as a paste for relief of pain in treatment of minor burns and insect bites and stings. A cupful in the bath water may help relieve itching caused by an allergic reaction. Called also baking soda and bicarbonate of soda.
sodium biphosphate monobasic sodium phosphate.
sodium carbonate a compound now used primarily as an alkalizing agent in pharmaceuticals; it has been used as a lotion or bath in the treatment of scaly skin, and as a detergent.
sodium chloride common table salt, a necessary constituent of the body and therefore of the diet, involved in maintaining osmotic tension of blood and tissues; uses include replenishment of electrolytes in the body, irrigation of wounds and body cavities, enema, inhaled mucolytic, topical osmotic ophthalmic agent, and preparation of pharmaceuticals. Called also salt.
sodium citrate a sodium salt of citric acid, used as an anticoagulant for blood or plasma that is to be fractionated or for blood that is to be stored. It is also administered orally as a urinary alkalizer.
dibasic sodium phosphate a salt of phosphoric acid; used alone or in combination with other phosphate compounds, it is given intravenously as an electrolyte replenisher, orally or rectally as a laxative, and orally as a urinary acidifier and for prevention of kidney stones.
sodium ferric gluconate a hematinic used especially in treatment of hemodialysis patients with iron deficiency anemia who are also receiving erythropoietin therapy. Administered by intravenous injection.
sodium fluoride a dental caries preventative used in fluoridation of drinking water or applied topically to teeth. Topical preparations include gels (sodium fluoride and phosphoric acid gel, also called APF gel) and solutions (sodium fluoride and acidulated phosphate topical solution, also called APF solution).
sodium glutamate monosodium glutamate.
sodium hydroxide NaOH, a strongly alkaline and caustic compound; used as an alkalizing agent in pharmaceuticals.
sodium hypochlorite a compound having germicidal, deodorizing, and bleaching properties; used in solution to disinfect utensils, and in diluted form (Dakin's solution) as a local antibacterial.
sodium iodide a compound used as a source of iodine.
sodium lactate a compound used in solution to replenish body fluids and electrolytes.
monobasic sodium phosphate
1. a monosodium salt of phosphoric acid; used in buffer solutions, as a urinary acidifier, as a laxative, and as a source of phosphorus in hypophosphatemia, often in combination with potassium phosphate.
2. a monosodium salt of phosphoric acid; used in buffer solutions. Used alone or in combination with other phosphate compounds, it is given intravenously as an electrolyte replenisher, orally or rectally as a laxative, and orally as a urinary acidifier and for prevention of kidney stones.
sodium monofluorophosphate a dental caries preventative applied topically to the teeth.
sodium nitrite an antidote for cyanide poisoning; also used as a preservative in cured meats and other foods.
sodium nitroprusside an antihypertensive agent used in the treatment of acute congestive heart failure and of hypertensive crisis and to produce controlled hypotension during surgery; also used as a reagent.
sodium phenylbutyrate an agent used as adjunctive treatment to control the hyperammonemia of pediatric urea cycle enzyme disorders.
sodium phosphate any of various compounds of sodium and phosphoric acid; usually specifically dibasic sodium phosphate.
sodium polystyrene sulfonate an ion-exchange resin used for removal of potassium ions in hyperkalemia, administered orally or rectally.
sodium propionate a salt used as an antifungal preservative in foods and pharmaceuticals and as a topical antifungal agent.
sodium salicylate see salicylate.
sodium sulfate a cathartic and laxative.
sodium thiosulfate a compound used intravenously as an antidote for cyanide poisoning, in foot baths for prophylaxis of ringworm, and as a topical antifungal agent for tinea versicolor. Also used in measuring the volume of extracellular body fluid and the renal glomerular filtration rate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

so·di·um ni·trite

used to lower systemic blood pressure, to relieve local vasomotor spasms, especially in angina pectoris and Raynaud disease, to relax bronchial and intestinal spasms, and as an antidote for cyanide poisoning.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sodium nitrite

A preservative and flavour-enhancing agent added to luncheon meat (e.g., bologna), chorizo, salami, ham, hot dogs and other processed meats. Heating or reduced pH (as seen in the stomach) causes sodium nitrite to combine with secondary amines, forming nitrosamines, which are known carcinogens.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sodium nitrite

Food industry A preservative and flavor-enhancer added to processed meats–bologna, salami, ham, and hot dogs. See Food additives, Nitrates, Nitrites, Nitrosamines.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

so·di·um ni·trite

(sō'dē-ŭm nī'trīt)
An injectable compound used immediately after inhalation of amyl nitrite in the antidotal treatment of cyanide poisoning in the U.S.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sodium nitrite

A drug used in the treatment of cyanide poisoning in conjunction with SODIUM THIOSULPHATE. The drug is on the WHO official list.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
* If a late-stage intermediate is considered a Regulatory Starting Material (RSM) and bought from an external vendor, it should be verified whether sodium nitrite has been used in any step of the manufacturing process of the RSM.
The 10 chemicals that resulted in TAN < 1.0 mg KOH/g at both concentrations included polyoxyethylene nonylphenyl ether, propylene glycol, EDTA, sodium molybdate, sodium paratoluene sulfonate, potassium fluoride, potassium hydrogen fluoride, sodium nitrite, sulfamic acid, and sodiumcarbonate, while the three chemicals thatresulted in TAN > 1.0 mg KOH/g at both concentrations were boric acid, potassium hydroxide, and ethanolamine.
The effect of pH and nitrite concentration on the antimicrobial impact of celery juice concentrate compared with conventional sodium nitrite on Listeria monocytogenes.
Carrier, 0.25% (v/v) ethanol solution containing 75 mM sodium hydroxide; R1, 50 mM sodium nitrite solution; R2, 100 mM sulphanilic acid solution; PP, peristaltic pump; IV, injection valve; RC-I, reaction coil-I, 200 cm; RC-II, reaction coil-II, 150 cm; CR, chart recorder.
Various factors associated with derivatization and extraction process were optimized, which included concentration and dosage of hydrochloric acid (HCl), the amount of saturated sodium nitrite (NaN[O.sub.2]), derivatization temperature, derivatization time, the extraction reagents, and extraction time.
Meanwhile, in the treatments in which only sodium nitrite was added, the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate increase almost simultaneously.
If you opt to add sodium nitrite to Lettau's recipe (page 90), all that's required is 1 teaspoon of pink curing salt (a mix of 6.25 percent sodium nitrite and 93.75 percent salt) for every 5 pounds of meat, mixed in with the dry rub in step 1.
Visual changes were observed with the copper coupons aged in the presence of Ethanolamine, Sodium Nitrite and Calcium Alkyl Aryl Sulfonate at high initial concentration and high temperature.
But, the first communication from Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) on possible medical effects of MIC poisoning said: If cyanide is suspected, use amyl nitrite; if no effect, use sodium nitrite 0.3 gms and thiosulphate 12.5 gms.
Sabic received the 2013 Sustainable Evansville Award for the development of a new process to recover and purify Sodium Nitrite, and the 2013 Most Valuable Pollution Prevention Award (MVP2) from the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR) for advancing a safer and more efficient process for cleaning manufacturing equipment.The two technologies significantly reduce greenhouse gas intensity, waste disposal, and energy and water usage, all of which are important factors for Sabic customers as they consider the environmental impacts of their products in the supply chain.
Why: Sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite are compounds added to processed meats such as bacon and ham to "cure'' them, boosting shelf life, improving flavor and adding color.