sociolinguistics

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sociolinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of the relationship between language and the social context in which it occurs. sociolinguistic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The text falls into four sections: The first section (chapter 2) provides a historical synopsis from 1499 to our days and is subdivided into three sociolinguistically relevant subsections.
Sociolinguistically speaking, this means that there is no reason for claiming that language did not vary in the same patterned ways in the past as it has been observed to do today' (cited p.
They resent the economic success of the new townspeople who came from the Hebron district, leading to an exacerbation of the conflict between townspeople (madani) and newcomers (from the Hebron district or fallahi) that is also reflected sociolinguistically.
Finally, the importance of approximating sociolinguistically appropriate English language models to minimize the negative effect of native language transfer is emphasized.
To list but a few factors: the simple assumption that Arabic dialects derive from or even are a corruption of Classical Arabic, the refusal to accord the sociolinguistically less prestigious variety the dignity of systematic historical investigation, a decrease of interest in historical linguistics in the wake of the rise first of theoretical, and more recently of cognitive linguistics.
One view argues, sociolinguistically, "[t]he forces which affect these movements are part of language evolution," which is inevitable.
Language, on the other hand, is vital and not so much indeterminate as multidimensional: it operates on more than one level, semantically, psycholinguistically, sociolinguistically, sometimes even psychosomatically.
In so doing, these studies have not really emphasized the sociolinguistically complex and fluid nature of code-switching, as well as the central importance of interlocutors, rhetorical purpose and self-interest in determining the nature of code-switching.
Kells notes that she is "concerned by a gap in our literature [composition/rhetoric studies] that leaves unexamined the implications and consequences of the prescriptivist practices of English studies among sociolinguistically marginalized student populations" (7).
He proposes as a useful distinction the terminology of medium which "is concerned with how the message is transmitted to its receivers" and mode which "is concerned with how it is composed stylistically, that is, with reference to sociolinguistically grounded norms of archetypical speech and archetypical writing.
In this approach the reader's focus on personal experience is replaced by the reader's knowledge of Discourses and the ways in which these can be represented sociolinguistically as texts.
As the various contributors stress, however, the findings represented in this volume constitute merely preliminary if promising investigations, revealing tendencies and trends in language which suggest the validity of these sociolinguistically oriented models of analysis in diachronic as well as synchronic terms.