sociolinguistics

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sociolinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of the relationship between language and the social context in which it occurs. sociolinguistic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
2005), Kortvelyessy (2010), Kortvelyessy and Stekauer (2014), and Kortvelyessy, Stekauer, Zimmermann (2015) where they made first steps to the evaluation of the influence of sociolinguistic factors (age, education, profession, language background in bilinguals) upon the preferred word-formation strategies of language speakers.
In this essay, we describe some major and minor sociolinguistic studies of signed language interpretation with the underlying assumption that interpretation itself constitutes a sociolinguistic activity from the moment an assignment is accepted, including the products and processes inherent to the task, reflecting variously issues of bilingualism or multilingualism, language contact, variation, language policy and planning, language attitudes, and discourse.
133-139) the author recapitulates the methods, starting points and results of her investigation and calls for an approach of research that also takes into consideration the sociolinguistic background of speakers and is not preoccupied with describing the hypothetical language use of an ideal speaker.
With regard to the teaching styles of university teaching staff (in terms of staff sociolinguistic competence, textual competence, and significant mores of university educational culture), answers to the following questions were sought:
In fact, what seems an innocuous methodological decision of not going back to the past sociolinguistic situation and the scenario observed 10-15 years ago, could involve that the distribution in use of a specific sound variable across different age groups would be reflecting a characteristic patterns of age gradation repeated in each generation rather than a linguistic change in the variety of a particular speech community, as Labov (2001) illustrates in many of the communities observed throughout the years of consolidation of the variationist paradigm.
Such investigations would yield useful findings both for sociolinguistic and cognitive linguistic aspects of language and gender research.
In Part 1 of his study, which is appropriately entitled Preliminaries, Lodge surveys the previous research on the language of Paris and lays the theoretical foundation for his sociolinguistic history of Parisian French.
Post-vocalic /r/ is a sociolinguistic variable in New York City, in England it defines basically a large-scale dialect isogloss, and in many parts of the American Midwest it shows little variation of any sort.
Incidentally, cultural studies and cultural theory have equally to add to the teaching of Foreign Languages, especially with respect to sociolinguistic competence.
But the book's principal interest lies in its use of French data, at successive levels of linguistic analysis, to cast doubt on putative sociolinguistic 'universals', largely drawn from studies of English.
While sociolinguistics has surely influenced Sweeney's overall thinking about letter-writing, it is not always apparent how the Egyptian evidence relates to the sociolinguistic preconditions and variables enunciated at the beginning of most of the chapters, or to what extent such principles refine the interpretation of the many passages that are cited.
It is a sociolinguistic form that resides among the artifacts of the shared history, heritage, and culture of Americans of African descent.