sociocentric

so·ci·o·cen·tric

(sō'sē-ō-sen'trik),
Outgoing; reactive to the social or cultural milieu.
[socio- + L. centrum, center]

so·ci·o·cen·tric

(sō'sē-ō-sen'trik)
Outgoing; reactive to the social or cultural milieu.
[socio- + L. centrum, center]
References in periodicals archive ?
As an example of the second way of viewing this contrast, Shweder & Bourne define the egocentric self (the individualist self) as "some idealized, autonomous, abstract individual existing free of society yet living in society," while they define the sociocentric self (the collectivist self) as one whose individual interests "take second place to the good of the collectivity.
Egocentric and sociocentric measures of network centrality.
Alyawarr has a section system with four sociocentric categories (Green 1992), whereas other Arandic groups have a subsection system with eight socio-centric categories.
She contrasts this against traditional Fijian social life in village, vanua, and the Methodist church, stating that the Harvest Ministry promotes an 'individualistic concept of self, emphasising the individual's ability and obligation to take control of his or her life,' and that churches such as this thereby 'implicitly challenge the dominant sociocentric value system that supports the vanua and is central to indigenous Fijian identity' (Brison 2007b:25-6).
The second wave saw a shift of thrust from the rural to the urban and from nature to environment prompting the discipline to be sociocentric.
35) But many university priest-prophets welcome the wide-open permissiveness of a utopian Society answerable only to itself, a permissiveness that permits them to write old moral and philosophic truths out of existence as they enshrine new ones in their Sociocentric New Bible.
She observes that "the compatibility between Jainism and environmentalism is largely a new, diaspora development and actually reflects a shift in ethical orientation away from a traditional orthodox liberation-centric ethos to a sociocentric or 'ecological' one.
According to Dumont (1985), Marriott (1976) and others, (4) the South Asian self is context-dependent, sociocentric, and lacking in autonomy (Spiro 1993: 115).
This situation may exist because of disease stigma, as in the case of AIDS, and there being few services that validate and attend to the needs of Spanish-speaking people with specific beliefs and cultural values such as a preference for allocentric (smooth) relationships, familism, acceptance of life's suffering, and the sociocentric quality of many Latino cultures (Barrio, 2001; Herrera, Lee, Nanyonjo, Laufman, & Torres-Vigil, 2009; Magana, 2006).
Migration from sociocentric to egocentric cultures may create difficulty in adjusting to a new society, and ethnic social support is an especially important factor in reducing subsequent distress.
All of these authors criticise the limited scope of sustainable design tools, techniques and approaches currently in common use and stress the need for designers to take an interdisciplinary approach when working in the sociocentric dimension and work with psychologists, biologists, chemists, ecologists and sociologists, so that problem solutions are found that are not only beneficial to the user but also to the wider community and environment.
This paper spotlights four inter-locking, synergistic and sociocentric practices that are cornerstones in the conceptual framework of African centered leadership-followership (ACL-F) theory.