sociocentric

so·ci·o·cen·tric

(sō'sē-ō-sen'trik),
Outgoing; reactive to the social or cultural milieu.
[socio- + L. centrum, center]

so·ci·o·cen·tric

(sō'sē-ō-sen'trik)
Outgoing; reactive to the social or cultural milieu.
[socio- + L. centrum, center]
References in periodicals archive ?
(1975) defined two main categories of values: the "outer-directed" and the "inner-directed." The outer-directed values include tribalistic (submissive to authority or tradition), conformist (sacrificial, has a low tolerance for ambiguity), and sociocentric (high need for affiliation and little concern for wealth), whereas inner-directed values include egocentric (aggressive, selfish, and impulsive), manipulative (materialistic, expressive, and self-calculating to achieve an end), and existential (a high tolerance for ambiguity and for those who have different values; usually expresses self but not at the expense of others).
This account is not only comprehensive, but also critical, and it manages to propose novel ideas such as the understanding of deixis as a sociocentric phenomenon.
Many approaches regard the four-section sociocentric systems of many parts of Australia as thoroughly integrated with Kariera kinship and marriage.
However, self-report questionnaires may encourage respondents from sociocentric cultures as Vietnam to answer less in consideration of social-desirability because of perceived anonymity.
[16.] Annalisa Socievole, Salvatore Marano, Exploring User Sociocentric and Egocentric Behaviors in Online and Detected Social Networks, University of CalabriaRende, Italy.
As an example of the second way of viewing this contrast, Shweder & Bourne define the egocentric self (the individualist self) as "some idealized, autonomous, abstract individual existing free of society yet living in society," while they define the sociocentric self (the collectivist self) as one whose individual interests "take second place to the good of the collectivity." (11) However, in this paper, we want to focus on the first way of characterizing individualism and collectivism, examining the different ways that self-identity is understood in the US and Balinese cultures.
(2.) Alyawarr has a section system with four sociocentric categories (Green 1992), whereas other Arandic groups have a subsection system with eight socio-centric categories.