society


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society

(sə-sī′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. socie·ties
1.
a. The totality of people regarded as forming a community of interdependent individuals: working for the benefit of society.
b. A group of people broadly distinguished from other groups by mutual interests, participation in characteristic relationships, shared institutions, and a common culture: rural society; literary society.
2. An organization or association of persons engaged in a common profession, activity, or interest: a folklore society; a society of bird watchers.
3. The wealthy, socially dominant members of a community. Also called high society.
4. Companionship; company: enjoys the society of friends and family members.
5. Biology A colony or community of organisms, usually of the same species: an insect society.

Patient discussion about society

Q. Why is it so hip to be thin and fit???? not everyone can be as thin and as fit as the society demands? was it always like that ? because i feel like if you are gaining a little extra pounds you are doomed !!! people condem you as a less better man in the good case .. in the worst case you won't have friends ....

A. i think that the in the biological way of thinking - people are attracted to what seems healthy, it has more chance of giving healthy child that will survive. in African cultures that food is scarce- being big considered to be healthy and attractive. in our culture- being over weight means unhealthy, but so is too skinny. so going back and forth with a few ponds is fine. but the two extreme situations are unattractive for most men.

Q. What do you think is the most serious nutritional issue facing us in an industrialized society today? I am very careful about taking care of my health. I never ever left my stomach empty. I always eat a nutritional diet. I am staying away from parents to support their financial needs. So I take more care with my health. If I am in good health then my family will be healthy. I often do a lot of research regarding my diet. I am very careful about that. If you are a dietician, please tell me what do you think is the most serious nutritional issue facing us in an industrialized society today?

A. PS...THE DYE IN FOOD....has been linked to cancer.

Q. Is this a malady if i am homosexual? because i feel sometimes very unhappy and outside the society... Some people would say - "oh yes", other could say: "i don't know, but i think this is not so common or normal", "homosexual? even the rats don't do it in the laboratories", "they should be exterminated", and so on. In fact we hear probably more bad stuff, than something else. My brother is homosexual and was very long depressive, because he could not tell it to our parents. Perhaps he is still depressive - a little bit from time to time. He lives with his partner. I do not pretend to have the key about it, nor the why nor the "how it comes". I share here with you what I have been taught some years ago. I can live with that. It makes for me sense. I know that many of you will not agree with it, but as long we have not a better explanation...

A. I've worked with different gay people, open and in the closet. I have nothing but good experiences with them. I have never had a talk with them regarding their bring up or how they discovered they were gay.

More discussions about society
References in classic literature ?
We see then: the means of production and of exchange, on whose foundation the bourgeoisie built itself up, were generated in feudal society. At a certain stage in the development of these means of production and of exchange, the conditions under which feudal society produced and exchanged, the feudal organisation of agriculture and manufacturing industry, in one word, the feudal relations of property became no longer compatible with the already developed productive forces; they became so many fetters.
Modern bourgeois society with its relations of production, of exchange and of property, a society that has conjured up such gigantic means of production and of exchange, is like the sorcerer, who is no longer able to control the powers of the nether world whom he has called up by his spells.
The proletariat, the lowest stratum of our present society, cannot stir, cannot raise itself up, without the whole superincumbent strata of official society being sprung into the air.
There will always be in society certain persons who are mercuries of its approbation, and whose glance will at any time determine for the curious their standing in the world.
As the first thing man requires of man is reality, so that appears in all the forms of society. We pointedly, and by name, introduce the parties to each other.
I discovered that they had an ethic superior to that of the rest of society. It was what I may call the aristocratic ethic or the master ethic.* They talked in large ways of policy, and they identified policy and right.
They do not know mankind nor society, and yet they set themselves up as arbiters of the fates of the hungry millions and all the other millions thrown in.
I, who have seen society reluctantly accepting works of genius for nothing from men of extraordinary gifts, and at the same time helplessly paying my father millions, and submitting to monstrous mortgages of its future production, for a few directions as to the most business-like way of manufacturing and selling cotton, cannot but wonder, as I prepare my income-tax returns, whether society was mad to sacrifice thus to him and to me.
It is our misfortune that the sordid misery and hopeless horror of his view of man's destiny is still so appropriate to English society that we even to-day regard him as not for an age, but for all time.
He is a little gay, a thing Society is accustomed to in young men, and he is very impressible.
She said all this, and everything else, as coldly as a woman of snow; quite forgetting the sisters except at odd times, and apparently addressing some abstraction of Society; for whose behoof, too, she occasionally arranged her dress, or the composition of her figure upon the ottoman.
The "cream of really good society" consisted of the fascinating Helene, forsaken by her husband, Mortemart, the delightful Prince Hippolyte who had just returned from Vienna, two diplomatists, the old aunt, a young man referred to in that drawing room as "a man of great merit"

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