social readjustment rating scale


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social readjustment rating scale

a scale of 43 common events associated with some degree of disruption of an individual's life. The scale was developed by the psychologists T.J. Holmes and R. Rahe, who found that a number of serious physical disorders, such as myocardial infarction, peptic ulcer, and infections, and a variety of psychiatric disorders were associated with an accumulation of 200 or more points on the rating scale within a period of 1 year. Most disruptive on one's life, according to the psychologists, was the death of a spouse, which warranted 100 points. The lowest rated event was a minor law violation, rated at 11 points.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of the adapted Social Readjustment Rating Scale and development of items to assess support seeking and experiences of Black immigrants limit generalizability of the study and underscore the need for the development of measures that effectively capture the experiences of this population.
Rahe, "The Social Readjustment Rating Scale," Journal of Psychosomatic Research 11, no.
Life events checklist: Revisiting the social readjustment rating scale after 30 years.
An examination on the social readjustment rating scale (Holmes et al.
Key words: social readjustment rating scale for elementary school children, life change unit, magnitude estimation, judges, elementary school teachers, children
Life events checklists: Revisiting the social readjustment rating scale after 30 years.
Moreover, Crandall (1992) has found that severity weights used with the Social Readjustment Rating Scale may not be even needed.
1967), The social readjustment rating scale, Journal of Psychosomatic Research,, 11, 213-218.
Students were asked to rate the number of stress points they would give to failing their A-levels on the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, where the death of a spouse is 100 points and the death of a close family member is 63 points.
The Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS; Holmes & Rahe, 1967) was used to assess a wide scope of life events that are related to stress and disease, ranging from daily hassles to traumatic events.
The questionnaire used to gather data about life stress was a 39-item adaptation of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale of Holmes and Rahe.