social psychology


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psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

social psychology

n.
The branch of psychology that deals with the behavior of groups and the influence of social factors on the individual.

social psychologist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

social psychology

The branch of psychology concerned with the study of groups and their influence on the individual's actions and mental processes.
See also: psychology
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The majority of the book is comprised of standard chapters focused on the types of attitudinal and behavioral issues common to textbooks in the field of social psychology, in particular, the self, social perception, attitudes, aggression, prosocial behavior, and interpersonal relations.
We selected the textbooks to review from a list of the 20 top-selling introductory social psychology textbooks provided by the Executive Editor of McGraw-Hill (M.
Perceived consensus influences intergroup behavior and stereotype accessibility Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 645-654.
Bibliometrics was also used in the analysis of handbooks (Tortosa & Carpintero, 1980) and Ibanez (1990) focused on social psychology. Calatayud, Carpintero, Peiro, and Tortosa (1985) show early bibliometric research was not only concerned with the study of recent Spanish psychology.
In these terms, The Rise and Fall of Social Psychology is in part a case study, the lowest of the low.
On the other hand, the demand for the inclusion of culture in social psychology courses, the call for a social psychology of humankind rather than just North Americans, and the flood of social psychological research in many different parts of the world poses major challenges and potential problems for teachers.
Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33(12), 2515-2535.
Aronson, Elliot (1969), "The Theory of Cognitive Dissonance: A Current Perspective," in Advances in Exp Social Psychology, Vol.
Lindzey (Eds.), The Handbook of Social Psychology (pp.589-597), Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.