social medicine


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so·cial med·i·cine

a specialized field of medical knowledge concentrating on the social, cultural, and economic impact of medical phenomena.

social medicine

A field of medicine that studies the impact of the collective behavior of organized society on individuals belonging to various, often disadvantaged, subgroups within the society. See Engel's phenomenon, Homelessness, Latchkey children, Supermom. Cf Socialized medicine.

so·cial med·i·cine

(sōshăl medi-sin)
Specialized field of medical knowledge concentrating on the social, cultural, and economic impact of medical phenomena.
References in periodicals archive ?
PUSPH offers master and doctoral degrees in public health, epidemiology, social medicine and health management etc.
"There is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer at seven sites in the body and probably others," Jennie Connor, a researcher with the preventive and social medicine department at Otago University in New Zealand who conducted the study, told the (https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/22/alcohol-direct-cause-seven-forms-of-cancer-study) Guardian.
Also appointed as a professor in the Department of Medicine, he joined the faculty on June 30 coming from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine where he was associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine and Social Medicine.
Prof Zeegers provided details about the institute's research faculty body and the various academic and research areas which include family medicine, epidemiology, methodology and statistics, international health, health promotion, health services research, orthopaedic surgery, rehabilitation, social medicine and ethics.
(1) Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; (2) Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; (3) Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark; (4) Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Barcelona, Spain; (5) Department of Genes and Environment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Toru Shirakawa, public health research fellow in the Department of Social Medicine at Osaka University in Japan, who led the research, said people should stand up occasionally and drink water during programmes.
To situate this fourth stage, we retake the periodization of the public health by showing that we cannot understand it today if we do not seek its antecedents in the formulations that were extended through the territories of hygiene, preventive and social medicine, and conventional public health4.
(5) The second, without completely abandoning preventive ideals, introduces the social medicine perspective in universities, and the third structure is the social field of collective health as a current of thought based on a way of understanding health with support on the social movement by the Brazilian health reform gestated during the democratization process in the 1980s.
These two studies through the correlations that are made between the population and the social factors, on the one hand, and between social and health policy makers, on the other hand, marked the beginning of a series of empirical studies that are under the influence of multiple and various macro-social phenomena that can be placed at the base of the social medicine and medical sociology.
Addressing the meeting, Salmaan Keshavjee, Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Programme in Infectious Disease and Social Change in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, said: "Like the concept of the last mile in health care we intend to deliver the last millimetre, expediting the path from the laboratory to the clinic to the patients in the communities where they live."
These findings underscore the importance of identifying and treating sleep-disordered breathing and insufficient sleep as early as possible to reduce later obesity, said Karen Bonuck, Ph.D., of the department of family medicine and social medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y., and her associates.
Robin Gauld, professor of health policy, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin